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It appears using either HOLDLOCK or UPDLOCK in a transaction (say T1), will not block read access from another transaction (say T2).

As I understand, until T1 completes, HOLDLOCK will prevent updates/deletes by T2; and a UPDLOCK will prevent updates/deletes/inserts by T2. In both these T2 will have read access to these records.

But, using both (like: HOLDLOCK, UPDLOCK) blocks T2 from even a read access. What exactly happens when we use both of them?

Thanks for your insight

Update:

That is not what I am seeing though:

For example:

In Query 1:

begin tran

select * from tblTest WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK)

WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:10'

commit tran

In Query 2:

select * from tblTest 

Query 2 does not yield results until Query 1 finishes.

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3  
No they don't block read acceess. Until you actually make a change to the row, which promotes the lock to exclusive. –  GSerg Jan 10 '13 at 18:18
2  
Ah some small print for UPDLOCK "If a table-level lock is taken for some other reason, an exclusive (X) lock will be taken instead." so that would block readers. –  Martin Smith Jan 10 '13 at 18:36
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3 Answers

UPDLOCK affects the type of lock. It means for a SELECT statement that U locks will be taken rather than an S lock. At default read committed level they will be released as soon as the data is read.

The above applies to row and page locks. For table level locks BOL states

If UPDLOCK is combined with TABLOCK, or a table-level lock is taken for some other reason, an exclusive (X) lock will be taken instead.

HOLDLOCK means that you get serializable isolation semantics so the locks won't be released until the end of the transaction and at least the whole range covered by your query will be locked to prevent insert of phantoms.

A U lock is compatible with other S locks but not other U locks (See Lock compatibility matrix) so if the locks were taken out at row or page level this will not block other readers unless they too use the UPDLOCK hint.

If an object level X lock is taken out due to UPDLOCK however then readers will be blocked trying to acquire an IS lock on the table. In your example query try looking at sys.dm_tran_locks whilst the second query is blocked to see what locks both transactions have / are waiting for.

For the query in your question

SELECT *
FROM   tblTest WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK) 

You will always get an X lock on the object if the query plan shows a scan on a heap. If it is an index scan it depends upon the locking granularity used (lock escalation to table level is generally attempted after at least 5,000 lower level locks are taken).

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Query 1 has X Granted, while Query 2 has IS Waiting. But, why is this so? I changed the query 1 to select just one record (id=1), and in query 2 I selected another record (id=2). And I still see the same. Why is doing an X lock on the entire table though instead of one record? Thanks. –  user1967701 Jan 10 '13 at 18:51
1  
Because you have specified HOLDLOCK so it needs to protect against phantoms. Your query reads the whole table so protecting the range against phantoms means it can't allow any rows to be inserted at all. In order to get a key range lock you need suitable index and where clause. –  Martin Smith Jan 10 '13 at 18:52
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I believe Martin already explained how the updlock can result in an exclusive lock (+1)... and I would rather post this as a comment / question, but my comment is too large...

Here's a quick example of the updlock resulting in the x lock...

IF (OBJECT_ID('tblTest') IS NOT NULL)
    DROP TABLE tblTest

CREATE TABLE tblTest (
    ID INT NOT NULL
)

BEGIN TRANSACTION
    SELECT * FROM dbo.tblTest WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK) WHERE ID = 1
    SELECT * FROM sys.dm_tran_locks WHERE request_session_id = @@SPID 
COMMIT

However, if you add a clustered index to your table, the exclusive table lock goes away, and is replaced with a RangeS-U lock...

ALTER TABLE dbo.tblTest 
ADD CONSTRAINT PK_tblTest 
PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (ID)

BEGIN TRANSACTION
    SELECT * FROM dbo.tblTest WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK) WHERE ID = 1
    SELECT * FROM sys.dm_tran_locks WHERE request_session_id = @@SPID 
COMMIT

So basically, do you have a clustered index on this table?

EDIT:

Another example using a non-clustered index...

IF (OBJECT_ID('tblTest') IS NOT NULL)
    DROP TABLE tblTest

CREATE TABLE tblTest (
    ID INT NOT NULL
)

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX 
IX_tblTest ON dbo.tblTest (ID) 

BEGIN TRANSACTION
    SELECT * FROM dbo.tblTest WITH (HOLDLOCK) WHERE ID = 1
    SELECT * FROM sys.dm_tran_locks WHERE request_session_id = @@SPID 
COMMIT

Will result in a RangeS-S lock...

But...

BEGIN TRANSACTION
    SELECT * FROM dbo.tblTest WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK) WHERE ID = 1
    SELECT * FROM sys.dm_tran_locks WHERE request_session_id = @@SPID 
COMMIT

Will result in an exclusive table lock...

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In the OP's query they don't have a WHERE clause so I think it will always lock the whole table to protect against phantoms. –  Martin Smith Jan 10 '13 at 18:51
    
@MartinSmith Ah yes... that's very true... my guess was that even if he added a where clause, without the clustered index it would still result in an exclusive table lock... –  Michael Fredrickson Jan 10 '13 at 18:53
    
Yes to take a key range lock it must have (and use) a suitable index for the WHERE clause. –  Martin Smith Jan 10 '13 at 18:55
    
@MartinSmith Thanks for the response... this has confused me for a while, so I'm glad I've got the chance to ask you about it... If a suitable non-clustered index exists which will allow the WHERE clause to take a range lock.. the updlock, holdlock will cause an exclusive table lock if there's no clustered index on the table... but will result in a range lock if there is a clustered index. This is just from my testing on Sql Server 2005. Is this expected? If so, why? –  Michael Fredrickson Jan 10 '13 at 19:01
    
I do not have a clustered index and based on your explanations, makes sense. I added the index and now the results in query 2 come up fine. Thanks all for your help in this. So in essence UPDLOCK,HOLDLOCK will not "always" block read access to other transactions but under the conditions you all have indicated. –  user1967701 Jan 10 '13 at 19:16
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Serializable isolation causes a table lock to be taken if the table does not have an appropriate index for the query. HOLDLOCK causes serializable to be the effective transaction isolation level for the table that it is mentioned on.

This together with the escalation to X that others have mentioned causes the behavior you see.

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