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My goal is to delete all records from my table that are NOT the MAX(recordDate) of a grouped CaseKey. So if I have 9 records with 3 sets of 3 casekeys, and each casekey has its 3 dates. I'd delete the 2 lower dates of each set and come up with 3 total records, only the MAX(recordDate) of each remaining.

I have the following SQL Query:

    DELETE FROM table
    WHERE tableID NOT IN (
    SELECT tableID
    FROM (
    Select MAX(recordDate) As myDate, tableID From table
    Group By CaseKey
    ) As foo
    )

I receive the error: Error on Line 3... Column 'table.tableID' is invalid in the select list because it is not contained in either an aggregate function or the GROUP BY clause.

Obviously I could add tableID to my Group By clause, but then the result of that statement is incorrect and returns all rows instead of just returning the MAX recordDate of the grouped CaseKeys.

Server is down right now, but the apparent answer is: (tiny tweak from WildPlasser's answer)

DELETE zt FROM ztable zt
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM ztable ex
    WHERE ex.CaseKey = zt.CaseKey
    AND ex.recordDate > zt.recordDate
);

In other words, for each record in zt, run a query to see if the same record also has a record with a higher recordDate. If so, the WHERE EXISTS statement passes and the record is deleted, otherwise the WHERE statement fails and the record is its own MAX recordDate.

Thank you, WildPlasser, for that simplistic methodology that I was somehow blowing up.

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Which DBMS are you using? Oracle? PostgreSQL? –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 10 '13 at 19:57
    
In other words, for each record in zt, run a query to see if ... No. Please check the query plan. There will not be one subquery started per row; the correlated subquery will lead to much more ingenious query plans, basically an "early exit join on a range search subquery". –  wildplasser Jan 11 '13 at 0:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is one special property of MAX: there is no record with a higher value than max. So we can delete all the records for which a record with the same CaseKey, but with a higher recordDate exists:

DELETE FROM ztable zt
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM ztable ex
    WHERE ex.CaseKey = zt.CaseKey
    AND ex.recordDate > zt.recordDate
    );

BTW: The above query (as well as the MAX() version) assumes that there is only one record with the maximum date. There could be ties.

In the case of ties, you'll need to add an extra field to the where clause; as a tie-breaker. Assuming that TableId can function as such, the query would become:

DELETE FROM ztable zt
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM ztable ex
    WHERE ex.CaseKey = zt.CaseKey
    AND (   ex.recordDate > zt.recordDate
        OR (ex.recordDate = zt.recordDate AND ex.TableId > zt.TableId)
        )
    );
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The business SQL Server is down at the moment, so I can't fully test it. But There is one small change. "DELETE zt FROM", and it appears it should work. Thank you for the simplicity. I'll update if it ends up not working. –  Suamere Jan 10 '13 at 22:57
    
Well as far as I know it is standard sql syntax. IMHO only the dreaded mysql would need different syntax (because it doesn't allow the table to be changed to be part of a subquery) –  wildplasser Jan 10 '13 at 23:01
    
Ew, ya. I'm using MS SQL Server, but without describing the alias defined for the table, it didn't like me. –  Suamere Jan 10 '13 at 23:04
    
It doesn't like an alias in a DELETE statement? Ah, now I see your edit; the syntax is slightly different. BTW: there is an inherent NULL problem in the NOT IN (....) construct. In your case, the affected fields are probably not NULLable, but if ther were, you could delete too many records. Be careful with NOT IN ... –  wildplasser Jan 10 '13 at 23:06

Just express

delete all records from my table that are NOT the MAX(recordDate) of a grouped CaseKey

in sql as

DELETE FROM table t1
WHERE t1.recordDate <> 
  (SELECT MAX(recordDate)
   FROM table t2
   WHERE t2.CaseKey = t1.CaseKey)
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You can rank all records with the same caseKey where the rank > 1 to only return the lower dates. That way you can use your tableID.

DELETE FROM [table]
WHERE [tableID] IN
  (SELECT
    [sub].[tableID]
  FROM
  (
    SELECT 
      [tableID],
      Rank() OVER (PARTITION BY [caseKey] ORDER BY [recordDate] DESC, [tableID] DESC) AS [rank]
    FROM [table]
  ) AS [sub]
  WHERE [sub].[rank] > 1)
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