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Please run it on your machine using gcc and tell if it also gives you a segmentation fault output. I don't think there is any problem with the program. I am a beginner in C. So Help!!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *scat(char *,char *);

void main()
{
    char *s="james";
    char *t="bond";

    char *w=scat(s,t);
    printf("the con: %s\n", w);
    free(w);
}

char *scat(char *s,char *t)
{ 
    char *p=malloc(strlen(s)+strlen(t)+1); 
    int temp=0 , ptr=0;

    while(s[temp]!='\0'){
        p[ptr++]=s[temp++];
    } 
    temp=0;
    while(t[temp]='\0'){
        p[ptr++]=t[temp++];
    }
    return p;
}
share|improve this question
3  
If you get a segmentation fault, so the program has a problem... –  DGomez Jan 10 '13 at 19:41
    
You should probably try formatting your code better. –  Carl Norum Jan 10 '13 at 19:41
2  
First mistake: "I don't think there is any problem with the program" –  Joe Jan 10 '13 at 19:41
    
memcpy() is your friend. –  wildplasser Jan 10 '13 at 19:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The second loop has no effect:

while(t[temp]='\0') { // <<== Assignment!!!
    p[ptr++]=t[temp++];
}

This should be a != not =, or better yet, you can drop zero altogether:

while(t[temp]) { // Zero-checking is implicit in C
    p[ptr++] = t[temp++];
}

Since you are not writing to s or t, it's probably a good idea to declare them both const. This would have caught the assignment in the while loop above.

share|improve this answer
    
It should probably be !=. Good catch! –  wildplasser Jan 10 '13 at 19:43
    
@wildplasser Thanks for catching the == vs. != :) –  dasblinkenlight Jan 10 '13 at 19:45
1  
And since string literals are passed in, that is probably where it crashes. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 10 '13 at 19:45
    
@DanielFischer Right, so it's probably a good idea to declare both params const. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 10 '13 at 19:46
    
have run it on your gcc compiler and seen it? –  Kundan Negi Jan 10 '13 at 19:46

You don't 0-terminate the string in scat. You could add:

p[ptr] = 0;

Right before returning.

share|improve this answer
    
please run it own your gcc compiler and tell me? –  Kundan Negi Jan 10 '13 at 19:47
    
Naw man, it could wake Cthulhu because of the undefined behavior. WHOOPS! –  cnicutar Jan 10 '13 at 19:48
  1. Please run it on your machine using gcc and tell if it also gives you a segmentation fault output.
  2. I don't think there is any problem with the program.

I don't follow your reasoning. If the program segfaults on your system then it is very likely that the program is at fault.

FYI this is what GCC(*) outputs. It doesn't even compile.

NOTE: It's g++ actually, but it shouldn't make too much of a difference.

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was that output with -Wall, mr strawhat? –  Mike Jan 10 '13 at 19:49
    
i copied this same program some a person. his program works and mine not. i rechecked both the programs 10 times but still the problem persist –  Kundan Negi Jan 10 '13 at 19:49
    
@Mike it's compiled with -Wall -Werror -Wextra -pedantic-errors –  StackedCrooked Jan 10 '13 at 19:49
    
what are these? –  Kundan Negi Jan 10 '13 at 19:50
1  
+1 for -Wall & friends, -1 for compiling C code as C++ :) so you're even ;) –  Andreas Grapentin Jan 10 '13 at 20:08

There is no need to emulate the functions that exist in string.h:

#include <string.h>

char *scat(char *s,char *t)
{ 
    char *p;
    size_t len1, len2;
    len1 = strlen(s);
    len2 = strlen(t);

    p=malloc(len1+len2+1);
    if (!p) barf();
    memcpy(p,s, len1);
    memcpy(p+len1, t, len2+1);

    return p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ya i know my friend but it is an exercise i want to try. –  Kundan Negi Jan 10 '13 at 19:54
    
talking about functions that exist in string.h: strcat() –  Andreas Grapentin Jan 10 '13 at 20:03
    
@KundanNegi reimplementing functions that are part of the C standard is generally a bad idea. Try exercising the use of said functions with a more complex example instead and you'll learn more useful aspects of the language. –  Andreas Grapentin Jan 10 '13 at 20:05
    
Well, if you really want to avoid library functions, you could roll your own strlen(), too. –  wildplasser Jan 10 '13 at 20:13

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