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The following (unoptimal) code generates all the subsets of size N for certain subset.

This code works but, as I said, is highly unoptimal. Using an intermediate list to avoid the O(log(n)) of Set.insert doesn't seem help due to the large cost of later reconverting the list to a Set

Can anybody suggest how to optimize the code?

import qualified Data.Set as Set


subsetsOfSizeN :: Ord a => Int -> Set.Set a -> Set.Set (Set.Set a)
subsetsOfSizeN n s
  | Set.size s < n || n < 0 = error "subsetOfSizeN: wrong parameters"
  | otherwise = doSubsetsOfSizeN n s
 where doSubsetsOfSizeN n s
        | n == 0 = Set.singleton Set.empty
        | Set.size s == n = Set.singleton s
        | otherwise =
           case Set.minView s of
             Nothing -> Set.empty
             Just (firstS, restS) ->
               let partialN n = doSubsetsOfSizeN n restS in
               Set.map (Set.insert firstS) (partialN (n-1)) `Set.union` partialN n
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This code works but, as I said, is highly unoptimal.

Doesn't seem so terribly bad to me. The number of subsets of size k of a set of size n is n `choose` k which grows rather fast for k ~ n/2. So creating all the subsets must scale badly.

Using an intermediate list to avoid the O(log(n)) of Set.insert doesn't seem help due to the large cost of later reconverting the list to a Set.

Hmm, I found using lists to give better performance. Not asymptotically, I think, but a not negligible more-or-less constant factor.

But first, there is an inefficiency in your code that is simple to repair:

Set.map (Set.insert firstS) (partialN (n-1))

Note that Set.map must rebuild a tree from scratch. But we know that firstS is always smaller than any element in any of the sets in partialN (n-1), so we can use Set.mapMonotonic that can reuse the spine of the set.

And that principle is also what makes lists attractive, the subsets are generated in lexicographic order, so instead of Set.fromList we can use the more efficient Set.fromDistinctAscList. Transcribing the algorithm yields

onlyLists :: Ord a => Int -> Set.Set a -> Set.Set (Set.Set a)
onlyLists n s
    | n == 0                    = Set.singleton Set.empty
    | Set.size s < n || n < 0   = error "onlyLists: out of range n"
    | Set.size s == n           = Set.singleton s
    | otherwise                 = Set.fromDistinctAscList . map Set.fromDistinctAscList $
                                                         go n (Set.size s) (Set.toList s)
      where
        go 1 _ xs = map return xs
        go k l (x:xs)
            | k == l = [x:xs]
            | otherwise = map (x:) (go (k-1) (l-1) xs) ++ go k (l-1) xs

which in the few benchmarks I've run is between 1.5 and 2× faster than the amended algorithm using Sets.

And that is in turn, in my criterion benchmarks, nearly twice as fast as dave4420's.

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This is inspired by Pascal's triangle.

choose :: [b] -> Int -> [[b]]
_      `choose` 0       = [[]]
[]     `choose` _       =  []
(x:xs) `choose` k       =  (x:) `fmap` (xs `choose` (k-1)) ++ xs `choose` k
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very nice, I like this one –  zurgl Jan 11 '13 at 23:07
    
Very elegant, congratulations :) –  miniBill Jan 11 '13 at 23:09

First, use a better algorithm.

Look at your final line:

           Set.map (Set.insert firstS) (partialN (n-1)) `Set.union` partialN n

Evaluating doSubsetsOfSizeN k (Set.fromList $ 1:2:xs) will involve evaluating doSubsetsOfSizeN (k-1) (Set.fromList xs) twice (once when inserting 1, and once when inserting 2). This duplication is wasteful.

Enter a better algorithm.

mine :: Ord a => Int -> Set.Set a -> Set.Set (Set.Set a)
mine n s | Set.size s < n || n < 0 = Set.empty
         | otherwise               = Set.foldr cons nil s !! n
    where
        nil :: Ord a => [Set.Set (Set.Set a)]
        nil = Set.singleton Set.empty : repeat Set.empty
        cons :: Ord a => a -> [Set.Set (Set.Set a)] -> [Set.Set (Set.Set a)]
        cons x sets = zipWith Set.union sets
                               (Set.empty : map (Set.map $ Set.insert x) sets)

mine 9 (Data.Set.fromList [0..18]) `seq` () is faster than subsetsOfSizeN 9 (Data.Set.fromList [0..18]) `seq` () and should have better asymptotic performance.

I haven't tried optimising this any further. There may be a better algorithm still.

(If the cost of insert and fromList are issues, you should consider giving back a list of lists instead of a set of sets.)

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I found this, may be it can help you

f []  = [[1]]
f l   = (:) [u] l'
    where 
        u  = succ (head (head l))
        l' = (++) l (map(\x->(:) u x) l)

fix f n = if (n==0) then [] else f (fix f (n-1)) 

To test it

$ length $ (fix f 10) => 1023 -- The empty set is always include then == 1024
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Is there a particular reason for (:) [u] l' rather than just [u]:l'? (And similarly the (++) and (:) in the definition of l'.) –  dbaupp Jan 11 '13 at 11:18
    
Yes, I prefer to use this form, because I can write in my where clause, cons = uncurry (:), concat = uncurry (++) and after replace [u]:l' by cons [u] l. –  zurgl Jan 11 '13 at 23:03
subsets :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
subsets 0 _ = [[]]
subsets _ [] = []
subsets k (x:xs) = map (x:) (subsets (k - 1) xs) ++ subsets k xs
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