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I have two tables: DATA

DATA_ID  |  SAMPLE_ID  |  ASSAY_ID  |  SIGNAL
101      |  201        |  301       |  2.87964
102      |  201        |  302       |  7.64623
103      |  202        |  301       |  1.98473
...

And SAMPLES:

SAMPLE_ID  |  SAMPLE_NAME  |  CATEGORY
201        |  SAMP0001     |  CAT A  
202        |  SAMP0002     |  CAT B
203        |  SAMP0003     |  CAT A
...

There are about 20,000 rows in SAMPLES. For each sample, there are about 40,000 rows in DATA. Each ASSAY_ID occurs exactly once per sample in DATA. I need to take a subset of the samples in SAMPLE and calculate a standard/z-score value for each signal value in DATA, grouping by ASSAY_ID. I am trying to create a stored procedure that will be called repeatedly, which will accept a single ASSAY_ID value and return SAMPLE_ID and ZSCORE pairs for all of the samples in the predefined sample subset.

Given a set of sample signal values (X = [3.21, 4.56, 1.12, ..]) for a given assay, the standard/z-score in this case is calculated as

(X[i] - median(X))/(K * MAD)

Where K is a scale factor equal to 1.4826 and MAD is the median adjusted deviation, equal to:

median(|X[i]-median(X)|)

Got that? Good :) Now, what is the most efficient way to perform this calculation using a SQL query? Execution time is key, given that there are close to a billion rows in DATA and a z-score needs to be calculated for almost every SIGNAL value.

Here is the best query I have been able to come up with so far:

WITH BASE AS (
    SELECT 
        S.SAMPLE_ID,
        D.SIGNAL
    FROM
        DATA D
        JOIN SAMPLES S
            ON D.SAMPLE_ID = S.SAMPLE_ID
    WHERE 
        S.CATEGORY IN ('CAT A', 'CAT B')
        AND D.ASSAY_ID = 12345
        AND S.SAMPLE_NAME NOT IN ('SAMP0003', 'SAMP0005', 'SAMP0008')          
)
SELECT  
    A.SAMPLE_ID,
    (A.SIGNAL-B.MED)/(1.4826*C.MAD) AS ZSCORE
FROM 
    BASE A,
    (
        SELECT MEDIAN(X.SIGNAL) AS MED 
        FROM BASE X
    ) B,
    (
        SELECT MEDIAN(ABS(Y.SIGNAL-YY.MED)) AS MAD 
        FROM BASE Y, 
        (SELECT MEDIAN(SIGNAL) AS MED FROM BASE) YY
    ) C 

Is there a more efficient way to perform this query?

Bonus Question: Can I write a single SQL query that would perform this calculation for EVERY ASSAY_ID in a single execution?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can you have a look at:

SELECT ASSAY_ID, SAMPLE_ID, 
       (SIGNAL - MED)/(1.4826F * MAD) AS ZSCORE
  FROM (
        SELECT ASSAY_ID, SAMPLE_ID, SIGNAL, MED,
               MEDIAN(ABS(SIGNAL - MED)) OVER (PARTITION BY ASSAY_ID) AS MAD
          FROM (
                SELECT ASSAY_ID, SAMPLE_ID, SIGNAL,
                       MEDIAN(SIGNAL) OVER (PARTITION BY ASSAY_ID) AS MED
                  FROM DATA    D
                  JOIN SAMPLES S USING (SAMPLE_ID)
                 WHERE S.CATEGORY IN ('CAT A', 'CAT B')
                   AND S.SAMPLE_NAME NOT IN ('SAMP0003', 'SAMP0005', 'SAMP0008')  
                   AND D.ASSAY_ID = 301
               )
       );

Is it correct? Is it faster? If it is, just remove the AND D.ASSAY_ID = 301 clause for the bonus question :-)

On the physical side, I would look into the data type for signal (BINARY_FLOAT or BINARY_DOUBLE are supposedly faster than NUMBER). And, if this is an option, I'd try to physically collocate the assays with partitions.

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Thanks, I'll give this a try when I get in to work tomorrow! Assuming that this is faster, why would it be? –  willOEM Jan 11 '13 at 0:06
1  
Without proper data I'm guessing a lot, but it looks like the WITH approach materializes the base query into a temporary table that gets fully scanned four times. The analytic function approach seems to get away with a single full scan of the table DATA. –  wolφi Jan 11 '13 at 0:14
    
Some quick tests indicate that this version of the query is slightly faster, and the query plan shows a small decrease in cost. Also importantly, this is cleaner code and a good answer to the bonus question. Thanks! –  willOEM Jan 11 '13 at 16:16
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