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I've made the same in JavaScript, but I'm new to JavaScript and I don't know how to convert it... :/

<script language="JavaScript">
<!--
var randomString = new Array ();
randomString[0] = "a random string";
randomString[1] = "another random string";
randomString[2] = "another random string";
randomString[3] = "another random string";
randomString[4] = "another random string";
randomString[5] = "another random string";
randomString[6] = "another random string";
randomString[7] = "another random string";
var i = Math.floor(7*Math.random())

document.write(randomString[i]);
//-->
</script>
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closed as not a real question by StriplingWarrior, ataylor, competent_tech, 0x7fffffff, Graviton Jan 14 '13 at 3:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Maybe show us your first try. –  Lee Meador Jan 10 '13 at 22:16
1  
What have you tried? –  fge Jan 10 '13 at 22:17
3  
Java and JavaScript are not at all the same thing. –  Pointy Jan 10 '13 at 22:17
    
If you are asking for Java code, please tag your question so. It is not sure what you are asking for –  Bergi Jan 10 '13 at 22:21
    
Math.random() –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 10 '13 at 22:21

2 Answers 2

My Java is a bit rusty, but how's this?

List<String> s = new List<String>(); //better than an array, because those are bounded
s.add("this is a string"); // first string
//repeat

int i = new Random().nextInt(s.size()); 
//from 0 - size exclusive, and the array starts at 0, so this is good

String result = s.get(i);
share|improve this answer
    
Are list indexes (in get) really one-based? That's interesting. –  Bergi Jan 10 '13 at 22:24
    
@Bergi there was that little bit about "rusty" ;-) –  jcolebrand Jan 10 '13 at 22:24

You have several options in Java. You can accomplish the same strategy you used here by using a String array:

String[] randomString = new String[8];
randomString[0] = "a random string";
randomString[1] = "another random string";
randomString[2] = "another random string";
randomString[3] = "another random string";
randomString[4] = "another random string";
randomString[5] = "another random string";
randomString[6] = "another random string";
randomString[7] = "another random string";
int i = Math.floor(randomString.length * Math.random());

System.out.println(randomString[i]);

Another option is to use the Java Collections Framework and use something like a List:

List<String> randomStrings = new LinkedList<String>();
randomStrings.add("a random string");
randomStrings.add("another random string");
randomStrings.add("another random string");

Once you have a List, you can do several things:

Collections.shuffle(randomStrings);
System.out.println(randomStrings.get(0));

or:

int i = Math.floor(randomStrings.size() * Math.random());
System.out.println(randomStrings.get(i));

The Collections.shuffle is going to actually modify the list and shuffle the elements around, so be aware of that.

share|improve this answer
    
The shuffle approach is particularly handy if you plan to pick out several random strings or you want a list of strings in random order. Again, keep in mind it's modifying the List, so the larger the list, the more expensive that call is. –  Marc Baumbach Jan 10 '13 at 22:28

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