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I am translating a numerical method that I wrote in MATLAB to Python. For some reason the Python code, which is almost identical, runs considerably slower. Here U and V are the unknowns which are solved for at every timestep. The size of U[:,n] and V[:,n] is 700x1. The rest of the variables (dt, A, and denom) are constants. Here is the loop (numpy has been imported as *):

for n in range(0, 400):
    UnVn2 = fft.fft(U[:, n] * V[:, n] ** 3)
    U[:, n +1 ] = fft.ifft((fft.fft(U[:, n]) / dt - UnVn2 + A) / denom)
    V[:, n + 1] = fft.ifft((fft.fft(V[:, n]) / dt + UnVn2) / denom)

Any suggestions? Thanks greatly.

share|improve this question
    
What python runtime? Is it using a JIT compiler? Are the BLAS and FFT routines as fast as the ones packaged with MatLab? IIRC, MatLab uses Intel and AMD binaries which are very heavily optimized. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '13 at 22:23
    
I am still very new to Python, but I am running the code just by importing the file into IDLE. Is that called JIT? The Python runtime seems to be at least 3 times over MATLAB. I had assumed that the numpy routines would be fully optimized since it is so commonly used for scientific computing. –  Doubt Jan 10 '13 at 22:32
1  
numpy is capable of using those optimized routines. See software.intel.com/en-us/articles/numpyscipy-with-intel-mkl But use the optimized library most appropriate for your processor. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '13 at 22:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure how MatLab organizes the axes in multi-dimensional arrays, but I'm pretty sure numpy uses the C-like row-major order (edit: Wikipedia even mentions that MatLab uses column-major order ;) ).

Since you're operating on single columns only all your operations must iterate over rows. With row-major ordering this is generally less efficient than iterating over whole rows. Consider transposing the layout of your 2d arrays and you should get a noticeable increase in performance.

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Thanks all for your help! –  Doubt Jan 17 '13 at 3:10

See this for instructions on making python and numpy use the same accelerated FFT routines that ship with MATLAB.

If you have an AMD processor, see these instructions instead.

share|improve this answer

I am not sure of why Python is slower than Matlab, but...

The FFT, as a fourier transform, has a number of properties, which yield most (all) of your FFT operations unnecessary:

def func1(U, V, dt, denom, A) :
    UnVn2 = np.fft.fft(U * V**3)
    U_ = np.fft.ifft((np.fft.fft(U) / dt - UnVn2 + A) / denom)
    V_ = np.fft.ifft((np.fft.fft(V) / dt + UnVn2) / denom)
    return np.vstack((U_, V_))

def func2(U, V, dt, denom, A) :
    UnVn2 = U * V**3
    U_ = (U / dt - UnVn2) / denom
    U_[0] += A / denom
    V_ = (V / dt + UnVn2) / denom
    return np.vstack((U_, V_))

U = np.random.rand(700)
V = np.random.rand(700)
dt, denom, A = tuple(np.random.rand(3))

>>> func1(U, V, dt, denom, A)
array([[ 2.35201751 -1.11022302e-16j,  0.81099082 -2.45463372e-16j,
         0.48451858 +2.15658782e-18j, ...,  2.23237712 -5.24753851e-16j,
         1.15264205 -2.31140087e-16j,  1.06670009 +1.28369537e-16j],
       [ 2.89314136 +8.67361738e-17j,  3.65612404 -7.80625564e-17j,
         3.31383830 +8.96916836e-17j, ...,  0.90415910 +6.27969898e-16j,
         3.03505664 +4.72358723e-16j,  0.64669863 +4.99600361e-16j]])
>>> func2(U, V, dt, denom, A)
array([[ 2.35201751,  0.81099082,  0.48451858, ...,  2.23237712,
         1.15264205,  1.06670009],
       [ 2.89314136,  3.65612404,  3.3138383 , ...,  0.9041591 ,
         3.03505664,  0.64669863]])
>>> np.max(np.abs(func1(U, V, dt, denom, A) - func2(U, V, dt, denom, A)))
1.5151595604785605e-15

And of course:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit('func1(U, V, dt, denom, A)', 'from __main__ import func1, U, V, dt, denom, A', number=400)
0.14169366197616284
>>> timeit.timeit('func2(U, V, dt, denom, A)', 'from __main__ import func2, U, V, dt, denom, A', number=400)
0.06098524703428154

Which I have to admit is less than I was expecting, but it is still almost 3x faster.

EDIT The speed from not doing FFTs seemed too small, so I modified func1 and func2 to return a tuple with (U_, V_) and run the following code:

from time import clock
U = np.zeros((700,400), dtype=np.float)
V = np.zeros((700,400), dtype=np.float)
U[:,0] = np.random.rand(700)
V[:,0] = np.random.rand(700)
dt, denom, A = tuple(np.random.rand(3))
t = clock()
for j in xrange(399) :
    U[:, j+1], V[:, j+1] = func1(U[:, j], V[:, j], dt, denom, A)
print clock() - t
t = clock()
for j in xrange(399) :
    U[:, j+1], V[:, j+1] = func2(U[:, j], V[:, j], dt, denom, A)
print clock() - t

The printed output was 11.5148652438 and 0.321673111194 so the speed-up in the actual problem setting is more like x30.

I also timed pwuertz's proposal, with no significant improvement, 11.1805414552 and 0.297830755317 for the following code:

U = np.zeros((400, 700), dtype=np.float)
V = np.zeros((400, 700), dtype=np.float)
U[0] = np.random.rand(700)
V[0] = np.random.rand(700)
dt, denom, A = tuple(np.random.rand(3))
t = clock()
for j in xrange(399) :
    U[j+1], V[j+1] = func1(U[j], V[j], dt, denom, A)
print clock() - t
t = clock()
for j in xrange(399) :
    U[j+1], V[j+1] = func2(U[j], V[j], dt, denom, A)
print clock() - t

It does look much, much neater, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Getting rid of the fft is certainly a big improvement. The impact of memory alignment however depends on the size of the array and the hardware. On my system I'm seeing an improvement of ~30% when switching the axes, and a factor of 2 for larger arrays (2000x2000). It's just a general advise to keep things like this in mind ;) –  pwuertz Jan 11 '13 at 10:13

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