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Following is a code I have editted from the book "cuda by example" for a testing of the CUDA concurrently kernel execution.

static void HandleError( cudaError_t err,
                         const char *file,
                         int line ) { 
    if (err != cudaSuccess) {
        printf( "%s in %s at line %d\n", cudaGetErrorString( err ),
                file, line );
        exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
    }   
}
#define HANDLE_ERROR( err ) (HandleError( err, __FILE__, __LINE__ ))

#define N   (1024*1024*10)
#define FULL_DATA_SIZE   (N*2)


__global__ void kernel( int *a, int *b, int *c ) {
    int idx = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x;
    if (idx < N) {
        int idx1 = (idx + 1) % 256;
        int idx2 = (idx + 2) % 256;
        float   as = (a[idx] + a[idx1] + a[idx2]) / 3.0f;
        float   bs = (b[idx] + b[idx1] + b[idx2]) / 3.0f;
        c[idx] = (as + bs) / 2;
    }
}


int main( void ) {
    cudaDeviceProp  prop;
    int whichDevice;
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaGetDevice( &whichDevice ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaGetDeviceProperties( &prop, whichDevice ) );
    if (!prop.deviceOverlap) {
        printf( "Device will not handle overlaps, so no speed up from streams\n" );
        return 0;
    }

    cudaEvent_t     start, stop;
    float           elapsedTime;

    cudaStream_t    stream0, stream1;
    int *host_a, *host_b, *host_c;
    int *dev_a0, *dev_b0, *dev_c0;
    int *dev_a1, *dev_b1, *dev_c1;

    // start the timers
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventCreate( &start ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventCreate( &stop ) );

    // initialize the streams
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaStreamCreate( &stream0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaStreamCreate( &stream1 ) );

    // allocate the memory on the GPU
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_a0,
                              N * sizeof(int) ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_b0,
                              N * sizeof(int) ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_c0,
                              N * sizeof(int) ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_a1,
                              N * sizeof(int) ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_b1,
                              N * sizeof(int) ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_c1,
                              N * sizeof(int) ) );

    // allocate host locked memory, used to stream
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaHostAlloc( (void**)&host_a,
                              FULL_DATA_SIZE * sizeof(int),
                              cudaHostAllocDefault ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaHostAlloc( (void**)&host_b,
                              FULL_DATA_SIZE * sizeof(int),
                              cudaHostAllocDefault ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaHostAlloc( (void**)&host_c,
                              FULL_DATA_SIZE * sizeof(int),
                              cudaHostAllocDefault ) );

    for (int i=0; i<FULL_DATA_SIZE; i++) {
        host_a[i] = rand();
        host_b[i] = rand();
    }

    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord( start, 0 ) );
    // now loop over full data, in bite-sized chunks
    for (int i=0; i<FULL_DATA_SIZE; i+= N*2) {
        // enqueue kernels in stream0 and stream1   
        kernel<<<N/256,256,0,stream0>>>( dev_a0, dev_b0, dev_c0 );
        kernel<<<N/256,256,0,stream1>>>( dev_a1, dev_b1, dev_c1 );
    }
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaStreamSynchronize( stream0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaStreamSynchronize( stream1 ) );

    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord( stop, 0 ) );

    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventSynchronize( stop ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventElapsedTime( &elapsedTime,
                                        start, stop ) );
    printf( "Time taken:  %3.1f ms\n", elapsedTime );

    // cleanup the streams and memory
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFreeHost( host_a ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFreeHost( host_b ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFreeHost( host_c ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFree( dev_a0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFree( dev_b0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFree( dev_c0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFree( dev_a1 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFree( dev_b1 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaFree( dev_c1 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaStreamDestroy( stream0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaStreamDestroy( stream1 ) );

    return 0;
}

First I did a CUDA profiling using nvvp, and found the two kernels are not overlapping at all: enter image description here Some previous posts on SO stated that the profiler may disable the concurrent kernel execution, so I did a plain running. The total time in the kernel loop was reported as 2.2ms, but he profiler reported the execution time of each kernel as 1.1ms. This still implies no (or very poor) overlap between the two kernels.

I am using CUDA4.0 on Tesla M2090. It seems that the kernel resource requirement (~10s of MB) should be small on this device (6G), and concurrent execution should be practical. Not sure where is the problem. Should I do something special to enable concurrent kernels (some APIs, some environment setup...)?

share|improve this question
2  
This question is a duplicate of this one. Your kernels are generating N/256 = 40960 blocks. The work distributor on your CC 2.0 device is distributing all of the blocks from the first kernel before any of the blocks from the second kernel. One way to think of this is that each of the 16 SMs in your M2090 has a stack of threadblocks on it. The first kernel call loads that stack up with 2560 threadblocks on each SM. All of those have to drain before any of the second kernel can be processed. So there is little overlap. –  Robert Crovella Jan 11 '13 at 1:41

1 Answer 1

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Do you specify for which compute architecture the code should compile? The default is 1.0, which doesn't support concurrent kernels if I'm not mistaken. Try adding the following to your nvcc invocation:

--generate_code code=sm_21,arch=compute_20

I don't know which compute architecture is supported by your card, but you should be able to find that somewhere on the net. But maybe just try the above first, if it fails, try sm_20 instead of sm_21.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, that actually made things worse. It is still not overlapping, and the GPU time has been kinda doubled. –  Hailiang Zhang Jan 10 '13 at 23:02
    
Down vote as code generation has no impact on whether the device supports concurrent kernel execution. –  Greg Smith Jan 11 '13 at 3:19
    
I see, sorry for the misinformation. –  lethal-guitar Jan 11 '13 at 19:58

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