Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following list in Python:

l = [[2], [3], [2, 2], [5], [2], [3], [7], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [2], [5], [11], [2, 2], [3], [13], [2], [7], [3], [5], [2, 2, 2, 2], [17], [2], [3, 3], [19], [2, 2], [5]]

I want to write a function that will return the uniquely-valued sublists of maximum length. In this case, the function would return:

l = [[5], [7], [3, 3], [11], [13], [2, 2, 2, 2], [17], [19]]

I am still a beginner at python, and I have very little idea as to how to write such a function, however. The furthest I got was figuring out that I could iterate over the sublists by using nested loops. But from what I've seen of Python, it seems like there must be some simpler way to return the list I am looking for than using loops.

Update:

Here's what I was doing with the code: solving project euler #5, the non-brute force way!

I'm sure this code could be refactored, but whatever.

Thanks for your help, guys. itemgetter was just what I needed.

#!/usr/bin/python
# coding = UTF-8

import argparse, sys, math
from itertools import groupby
from collections import defaultdict
from operator import itemgetter

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument('filename', nargs='?')
args = parser.parse_args()
if args:
   intinput = int(sys.argv[1])
elif not sys.stdin.isatty():
    intinput = int(sys.stdin.read())
else:
    parser.print_help()

def prime_factorize(n):
    factors = []
    number = math.fabs(n)

    while number > 1:
        factor = get_next_prime_factor(number)
        factors.append(factor)
        number /= factor

    if n < -1: 
        factors[0] = -factors[0]

    return factors

def get_next_prime_factor(n):
    if n % 2 == 0:
        return 2

    for x in range(3, int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(n)) + 1), 2):
        if n % x == 0:
            return x

    return int(n)


def mkfactors(n):
  tpf = []
  for i in range(n+1):
    tpf.extend(prime_factorize(i))
  return tpf

l = [list(g) for k,g in groupby(mkfactors(intinput))]

m = [max(g) for _,g in groupby(sorted(l,key=itemgetter(0)),key=itemgetter(0))]


prod = 1

for list in m:
  for element in list:
    prod *= element

print prod
share|improve this question
3  
Post the code you tried. –  Lattyware Jan 11 '13 at 0:15
1  
What have you tried? Did searching google or SO help you? –  Marcin Jan 11 '13 at 0:15
5  
Is it just me, or do I see prime numbers? –  yentup Jan 11 '13 at 0:17
    
Please remove -ve votes, he has fixed his question and received a lot of good responses. –  Siddharth Jan 11 '13 at 6:49
    
+1: This is a very reasonable question. –  Abhijit Jan 11 '13 at 7:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
from itertools import groupby
from operator import itemgetter

[max(g) for _,g in groupby(sorted(l),key=itemgetter(0))]

out:

[[2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [5], [7], [11], [13], [17], [19]]
share|improve this answer
    
i didn't know about itemgetter! thank you. –  magnetar Jan 11 '13 at 3:39
    
You don;t need the key while sorting. –  Abhijit Jan 11 '13 at 4:34
    
@Abhijit -- thanks, fixed it. –  root Jan 11 '13 at 6:48

If you know that every sublist has the same elements, you can do:

l = [[2], [3], [2, 2], [5], [2], [3], [7], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [2], [5], [11], [2, 2], [3], [13], [2], [7], [3], [5], [2, 2, 2, 2], [17], [2], [3, 3], [19], [2, 2], [5]]

from collections import defaultdict

my_dict = defaultdict(list)

for ele in l:
    if len(my_dict[ele[0]]) < len(ele):
        my_dict[ele[0]] = ele

Result:

>>> my_dict.values()
[[2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [5], [7], [11], [13], [17], [19]]
share|improve this answer

The easiest thing to do here is to use a data structure that makes the problem simple, and then you can always convert back after the fact.

For example, a dict mapping keys (primes) to lengths (exponents) is easy. So:

>>> l = [[2], [3], [2, 2], [5], [2], [3], [7], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [2], [5], [11], [2, 2], [3], [13], [2], [7], [3], [5], [2, 2, 2, 2], [17], [2], [3, 3], [19], [2, 2], [5]]
>>> d = {}
>>> for sublist in l:
...     value, count = sublist[0], len(sublist)
...     if count > d.get(value, 0):
...         d[value] = count
>>> d
{2: 4, 3: 2, 5: 1, 7: 1, 11: 1, 13: 1, 17: 1, 19: 1}

It should be obvious how to turn that back into a list of lists, so I'll leave that to you.

Note that this loses the order, but you can trivially fix that with OrderedDict. It also loses list identity—e.g., the [2, 2, 2, 2] that you get back at the end will be equal to, but not the same as, the original [2, 2, 2, 2]. But that's easy to fix too—just stored the sublist directly instead of using count. Anyway, I don't think either of these is relevant to your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
@Marcin: A typo. Fixed. –  abarnert Jan 11 '13 at 0:37
    
Note that you don't lose the order, because of the hashing algorithm. –  Marcin Jan 11 '13 at 0:44
    
@Marcin: Actually, you do lose the order—you end up with sorted order instead—because of the hashing algorithm. But either way, that's not something guaranteed by the language, it just happens to be true with this range of numbers with current CPython implementations. –  abarnert Jan 11 '13 at 0:55
l = [[2], [3], [2, 2], [5], [2], [3], [7], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [2], [5], [11], [2, 2], [3], [13], [2], [7], [3], [5], [2, 2, 2, 2], [17], [2], [3, 3], [19], [2, 2], [5]]
l = [max(i for i in l if j in i) for j in (2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19)]
print(l)
# [[2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [5], [7], [11], [13], [17], [19]]

I guess all it is is just a list comprehension with nested for loops, but it works fine.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Use datastructures. –  Marcin Jan 11 '13 at 0:42

using collections.Counter and sets:

In [47]: s=set([x[0] for x in lis])

In [48]: c=[Counter(x) for x in lis]

In [49]: [max(c,key=lambda y:y[x]) for x in s]
Out[49]: 
[Counter({2: 4}),
 Counter({3: 2}),
 Counter({5: 1}),
 Counter({7: 1}),
 Counter({11: 1}),
 Counter({13: 1}),
 Counter({17: 1}),
 Counter({19: 1})]

Another way:

In [64]: from collections import defaultdict

In [65]: d=defaultdict(list)

In [66]: for x in lis:
    d[x[0]].append(len(x))
   ....:     

In [67]: [[x]*max(y) for x,y in d.items()]
Out[67]: [[2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [5], [7], [11], [13], [17], [19]]
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 far from obvious how this works. –  Marcin Jan 11 '13 at 0:41
2  
@Marcin try to understand it then. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 11 '13 at 0:44
1  
If this isn't supposed to be understood, it's not an answer. –  Marcin Jan 11 '13 at 1:27
2  
Any non-trivial answer without an explanation of how it works isn't great - as it doesn't really help anyone in the long-run. –  Lattyware Jan 11 '13 at 3:20

A straightforward solution would be to convert the sorted list to a dict with key as the first element of the list, which would eventually remove duplicates based on key.

>>> {e[0]: e for e in sorted(l)}.values()
[[2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [5], [7], [11], [13], [17], [19]]

for Python Version < 2.7 where dict comprehension is not available

>>> dict((e[0], e) for e in sorted(l)).values()
[[2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [5], [7], [11], [13], [17], [19]]
share|improve this answer
    
The rarely-used dict comprehension! Of course, this won't work in versions less than 2.7. –  Marcin Jan 11 '13 at 18:39
    
@Marcin: Off-course, you can always use the dict in build type to achieve the same result. –  Abhijit Jan 11 '13 at 18:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.