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I have a routine that creates a dictionary from a table of strings. Depending on the exact application, these strings may represent integers ("123"), floats ("12.3"), or strings ("foo bar"), but any valid type is directly castable from string when written explicitly. For instance, this works fine (VB.NET):

Class IntStrDict
    Sub Add()
        Dim k As String = "123"
        Dim v As String = "foo bar"
        Dim d As New Dictionary(Integer, String)
        d.Add(k, v)
    End Sub
End Class

But I'd really like to make this code generic, so I rewrite as:

Class PairDict(Of TKey, TValue)
    Sub Add(k As TKey, v As TValue)
        Dim k As String = "123"
        Dim v As String = "foo bar"
        Dim d As New Dictionary(TKey, TValue)
        d.Add(k, v)
    End Sub
End Class

But this doesn't work because .NET doesn't know that a String can be cast directly to a TKey or TValue. Is there some kind of interface like CastableFrom where I could declare the Class something like this?

Class PairDict(Of TKey As CastableFrom(Of String), TValue As CastableFrom(Of String))
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Interface types are designed to operate on instances that already exist. As such, an interface like IConvertableTo(Of Out TDest) expresses a meaningful concept: if one has an object of type Foo which implements IConvertable(Of Out Bar), one will have something that can perform the conversion. By contrast, IConvertableFrom(In TSrc) doesn't quite work, since one can't use the interface until one has an object that implements it; if the only way one has to produce such an object would be via the interface, there's a chicken-and-egg problem.

There are a couple of solutions. One could have a type IConverter(In TSrc, Out TDest), and have methods that need to be able to perform conversions accept instances of that type. Alternatively, if one has a type which allows instances to be created "blank" and then "filled in", one could use a constraint of {New,ILoadableFrom(In TSrc)}. That would allow something like:

Shared Function Convert(Of TSource, TDest As {New, ILoadableFrom(TSource)})(Src as TSource)
    Dim Result = New TDest()
    Result.LoadFrom(TSource)
    Return Result
End Function

The biggest weakness of this approach is that it requires that the destination type include a default constructor. One more variation which might be worth considering would be to require as a matter of contract that every type which implements interface ICastableFrom(of T) must include a static method Function CastFrom(T param) As [itsOwnType]. One could then write a static method with signature Function ICastableCast(Of TSrc, TDest)(src as TSrc) as TDest which would use Reflection to find static method TDest.CastFrom(param as TSrc) As TDest and invoke it. If Reflection was only used once for each (TSrc,TDest) pair, such a method could be reasonably fast.

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This is a good point (IConvertableFrom not really making sense in .NET while IConvertableTo does make sense), but I want to actually use the hypothetical non-working code in the question so I think my above answer better addresses the intent. But, your answer does address the title of the question better -- I should stop assuming that my questions will have a particular type of answer when picking headlines. I think the strict answer to my headline question in context is that there is no way specify at compile time that a generic type can be cast to another type; dynamic checking is necessary –  Ben Feb 8 '13 at 17:59
    
The Reflection-based approach would allow the use of code similar to what you posted in your answer, without requiring the dynamic features that did not become available until .Net 4.0. –  supercat Feb 8 '13 at 20:02
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Figured it out from this question: CTypeDynamic (.NET 4.0+ only). This doesn't work:

Class PairDict(Of TKey, TValue)
    Sub Add(k As TKey, v As TValue)
        Dim k As String = "123"
        Dim v As String = "foo bar"
        Dim d As New Dictionary(TKey, TValue)
        d.Add(CType(k, TKey), CType(v, TValue))
    End Sub
End Class

...but this does:

Class PairDict(Of TKey, TValue)
    Sub Add(k As TKey, v As TValue)
        Dim k As String = "123"
        Dim v As String = "foo bar"
        Dim d As New Dictionary(TKey, TValue)
        d.Add(CTypeDynamic(Of TKey)(k), CTypeDynamic(Of TValue)(v))
    End Sub
End Class

Here's a useful example of what someone might do with this functionality:

Public Class DictionaryGenerator(Of TKey, TValue)
    Public Function Generate(path As String, Optional excludeheader As Boolean = True) As Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue)
        Dim d As New Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue)

        Dim r As New Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser(path)
        r.TextFieldType = FileIO.FieldType.Delimited
        r.SetDelimiters(",")
        r.TrimWhiteSpace = True
        Dim csvline As String()
        If excludeheader Then r.ReadLine()
        While Not r.EndOfData
            csvline = r.ReadFields()
            d.Add(CTypeDynamic(Of TKey)(csvline(0)), CTypeDynamic(Of TValue)(csvline(1)))
        End While
        r.Close()

        Return d
    End Function
End Class
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