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I have a script that adds a class to an element on hover.

Issue is the new, added class does not seem to 'overwrite' the existing css (even though on my style sheet the added class is listed below the existing css).

I cannot use removeClass on the element as there is no actual initial class styling the element.

The 'initial' styling that needs to be overwritten is:

#menu ul li ul li {
background-color: #ccc;
}

The class that needs to be added is:

.whitebg {
background-color: #fff;
}

My script is:

$('#menu ul li ul li').hover(
function() {
    $(this).addClass('whitebg');
},
function () {
    $(this).removeClass('whitebg');
  }
);

Does anyone know a way I can fix this up?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
You need to learn about CSS specificity when there are multiple rules targeting the same object with different selectors. –  jfriend00 Jan 11 '13 at 1:08
1  
Also about CSS specificity, a nice little tool for comparing the weight of two selectors when in doubt is specificity.keegan.st –  Nobita Jan 11 '13 at 1:32
    
Why use the jQuery .hover() method at all? Use the CSS pseudo-selector :hover instead. My 3-level menu (menubar with menus that have sub-menus) requires exactly zero lines of javascript. Your CSS can have #menu ul li ul li and #menu ul li ul li:hover with different colors. Because of the way we change colors during navigation, we also have #menu ul li:hover ul li and #menu ul li ul:hover li rules. We later enhanced the menu with javascript timers so the menus would not snap closed the moment the mouse drifts outside the rectangle. –  Stephen P Jan 11 '13 at 1:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is because of the specificity. you can use !important as the other posts suggested but using !important in your CSS is a bad practice.

Only use that when you run out of all the options.

Instead use two classes..

Make sure the inner most li has the default class to it..

$('#menu ul li ul li').addClass('default').hover(
   function() {
      $(this).addClass('whitebg').removeClass('default');
   },
   function () {
      $(this).removeClass('whitebg').addClass('default');
   }
);

Check Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I do agree with this but unfortunetly for me the CMS I am using makes it difficult to apply a class directly to that particular element. I could use JQuery to apply the class as in your example but that would require total reliance on JavaScript. That being said, in your opinion, which do you think is stronger: total reliance on JQuery or reliance on !important? –  MeltingDog Jan 11 '13 at 1:34
    
If you want the things be done really quick and dirty then !important is the way to go. Otherwise I would rely on javascript .. you would just need a extra addClass in the same selector.. i have updated the post and the fiddle for your reference –  Sushanth -- Jan 11 '13 at 1:37

id selectors take precedence over class selectors. You need !important

.whitebg {
background-color: #fff !important;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is more accurate to say "In a selector, an id has higher specificity than a class" -- the truth is that more specific selectors take precedence over less specific selectors. –  Stephen P Jan 11 '13 at 2:06

Simply add the !important tag to the background-color in .whitebg class. That should fix your problem.

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then, you need code this:

#menu ul li ul li {
  background-color: #ccc;
}
#menu ul li ul li.whitebg {
  background-color: #fff;
}

Only in this way, can we have a common parent class.

!important will be a compatibility problem.

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