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I'm working on a ASP.NET MVC (an older version) application and I have a form where students are assigned an adviser based on a major code AND by alpha of a student's last name.

I am trying to implement the below code but it is showing red scribbles to & operator:

Error: operator '&' cannot be applied to operands of type 'System.Linq.IQueryable<Appointments.Models.MajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlpha>' and 'lambda expression' and 'lambda expression'

var majorAssignmentByAlpha = FindAllMajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlphas()
    .Where(
           a => a.MajorString == student.StudentMajor) &
           (a => ((String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaStart) >= 0) &
                 (String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaEnd) <= 0))
    .FirstOrDefault());

if (majorAssignmentByAlpha != null)
    return majorAssignmentByAlpha.Adviser;

I would appreciate any help to understand what's wrong here. Thanks in advance!

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, nvoigt, EdChum, Ivan Ferić, Pinal Jul 16 at 7:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The answers below saying that & is the bitwise and operation and && is the logical are wrong. & can be either bitwise or logical but, if logical, always executed both sides. && skips the right half if the left half is false. –  TheEvilPenguin Jan 11 '13 at 1:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would like to add a correction here: actually both && and & are boolean AND operators in C# (when used with bool). However the former will do a short-circuit evaluation:

Consider A && B, if A is false then B will not be evaluated since the result will be false no matter what is the truthness of B.

And for the error you are getting, probably that's because your & operator is comparing a boolean expression and a lambda expression (function). Try this

MajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlpha majorAssignmentByAlpha = FindAllMajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlphas().FirstOrDefault(
        a => a.MajorString == student.StudentMajor & String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaStart) >= 0 &
             String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaEnd) <= 0);

    if (majorAssignmentByAlpha != null)
        return majorAssignmentByAlpha.Adviser;
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2  
Consider flipping the position of the answer and the supplemental note. –  user166390 Jan 11 '13 at 1:33
    
Thanks for the formatting edit :) –  rexcfnghk Jan 11 '13 at 1:34
    
@rexcfnghk: Thank you! I used your code just slightly editing the parentheses after the 'a.AlphaEnd', like: MajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlpha majorAssignmentByAlpha = FindAllMajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlphas().FirstOrDefault( a => a.MajorString == student.StudentMajor & String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaStart) >= 0 & String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaEnd) <= 0); if (majorAssignmentByAlpha != null) return majorAssignmentByAlpha.Adviser; Hope it's correct, at least it doesn't give me an error message. –  Gregg Jan 11 '13 at 17:15
    
ah yes...slight typo. Thanks! –  rexcfnghk Jan 11 '13 at 17:48
    
Thank you! Sorry I didn't format my comments :( Do you know why i was getting red scribbles to 'FirstOrDefault()' when I was trying to implement the 'TheEvilPenguin's' code which is the last one in this discussion? (Error: 'bool' does not contain a definition for 'FirstOrDefault' and no extension method 'FirstOrDefault' accepting a first argument of the type 'bool' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference"). –  Gregg Jan 11 '13 at 18:09

That's because the operator that you're looking it's &&. Refactor your Linq expresssion like this

MajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlpha majorAssignmentByAlpha = FindAllMajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlphas().Where(
        a => a.MajorString == student.StudentMajor) &&
        (a => ((String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaStart) >= 0) &&
             (String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaEnd) <= 0)).FirstOrDefault());

    if (majorAssignmentByAlpha != null)
        return majorAssignmentByAlpha.Adviser;
share|improve this answer
    
See my comments above. & can be either logical or bitwise. –  TheEvilPenguin Jan 11 '13 at 1:23
    
Actually I agreed with you comment, but I think that in this scenario he's looking for this operator –  Jorge Jan 11 '13 at 1:26
1  
Sorry, I assumed that was what you meant as this code won't compile for me - it's still trying to logical-and a bool and a lambda. –  TheEvilPenguin Jan 11 '13 at 1:34

I think you're added too many parentheses. Try this:

MajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlpha majorAssignmentByAlpha = FindAllMajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlphas().Where(
            a => a.MajorString == student.StudentMajor &&
                 String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaStart >= 0) &
                 String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaEnd <= 0)).FirstOrDefault();

if (majorAssignmentByAlpha != null)
    return majorAssignmentByAlpha.Adviser;

.Where() takes a single expression returning bool. You are trying to and together two different expressions. If you remove the close parentheses before the &&, the open parentheses after and the second a =>, you're anding two boolean statements, which works.

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For some reason when I was trying to implement your code it was showing red scribbles to 'FirstOrDefault()'. (Error: 'bool' does not contain a definition for 'FirstOrDefault' and no extension method 'FirstOrDefault' accepting a first argument of the type 'bool' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference"). Sorry for asking you about this ed scribbles to 'FirstOrDefault' –  Gregg Jan 11 '13 at 17:28
    
@Gregg Fixed. Sorry, it worked in LINQPad but I must have made a mistake when copying it out. I had mismatched parentheses –  TheEvilPenguin Jan 13 '13 at 21:09

I think you meant to use && for the logical AND operation.

FirstOrDefault() also takes a Func<T, bool> so you could do:

var majorAssignmentByAlpha = FindAllMajorAdviserStudentAssignmentByAlphas().FirstOrDefault(
            a => a.MajorString == student.StudentMajor &&
            (a => ((String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaStart) >= 0) &&
                 (String.Compare(student.StudentLastName, a.AlphaEnd) <= 0));
share|improve this answer
    
While && is probably what should be used here, it will only shortcut evaluating the second operand. & can be either bitwise or logical. –  TheEvilPenguin Jan 11 '13 at 1:23
    
@TheEvilPenguin: While you are correct, I answered in the context of the OP's question, which is why I did not bother to mention that. –  Bryan Crosby Jan 11 '13 at 1:26
1  
Sorry, as the code still doesn't compile for me I made an assumption. –  TheEvilPenguin Jan 11 '13 at 1:32

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