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I would like to process set of messages concurrently, but I can't manage to make them transacional unless I set the VM to request-response... in which case the processing is not concurrent.

Mule documentation states that "Mule transactions are configured on synchronous endpoints", but I don't quite understand this restriction.
It is clear that inside a flow that you want to be transactional one should not spawn asynch flows, but it is not clear (to me) why one can't start (from a non tx main flow) any number of asynchronous flows each being transactional.

In other words why does this work fine:

enter image description here

but if I change the VM's to "one-way" it fails with:

org.mule.transaction.IllegalTransactionStateException: Can only bind "javax.sql.DataSource/java.sql.Connection" type resources

Is there a way around this?

XML for the flow:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<mule>
    <spring:beans>
        <spring:bean id="dataSource" name="dataSource" class="org.enhydra.jdbc.standard.StandardDataSource" destroy-method="shutdown">
            <spring:property name="driverName" value="org.h2.Driver" />
            <spring:property name="url" value="jdbc:h2:tcp://localhost/~/mule" />
            <spring:property name="user" value="sa" />
            <spring:property name="password">
                <spring:value></spring:value>
            </spring:property>
        </spring:bean>

        <spring:bean id="transactionFactory" name="transactionFactory" class="org.mule.transport.jdbc.JdbcTransactionFactory" />

    </spring:beans>

    <jdbc:connector name="dbConnector" dataSource-ref="dataSource" validateConnections="true" queryTimeout="-1" pollingFrequency="0" doc:name="Database" />

    <flow name="triggerFlow" doc:name="triggerFlow">
        <http:inbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" host="localhost" port="8081" doc:name="HTTP" />
        <set-payload value="#[[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]]" doc:name="[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]"/>
        <collection-splitter doc:name="Collection Splitter"/>
        <vm:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" path="flow" doc:name="flow" />
    </flow>

    <flow name="flow" doc:name="flow">
        <vm:inbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" path="flow" doc:name="flow">
            <custom-transaction factory-ref="transactionFactory" action="ALWAYS_BEGIN" timeout="10" />
        </vm:inbound-endpoint>
        <logger message="#[payload]" level="INFO" doc:name="Logger"/>
        <jdbc:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" queryKey="insert" queryTimeout="-1" connector-ref="dbConnector" doc:name="Insert 1">
            <jdbc:transaction action="ALWAYS_JOIN" />
            <jdbc:query key="insert" value="insert into test values (#[payload], 'Test 1')" />
        </jdbc:outbound-endpoint>
        <jdbc:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" queryKey="insert2" queryTimeout="-1" connector-ref="dbConnector" doc:name="Insert 2">
            <jdbc:transaction action="ALWAYS_JOIN" />
            <jdbc:query key="insert2" value="insert into test values (#[payload + 10], 'Test 2')" />
        </jdbc:outbound-endpoint>
    </flow>

</mule>

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

Mule documentation states that "Mule transactions are configured on synchronous endpoints", but I don't quite understand this restriction.

This restriction is due to the fact that, in Mule like in Spring, and more generally in Java, transactions are thread-bound. With asynchronous flows, multiple threads are involved, hence the transaction-thread association can't be maintained.

So no, you can't split/fork/parallelize/asynchronous process messages and also have transactions in Mule.

org.mule.transaction.IllegalTransactionStateException: Can only bind "javax.sql.DataSource/java.sql.Connection" type resources

But this is unrelated to the first question IMO: this is because you forcefully, via a custom-transaction, try to enrol a VM endpoint in a JDBC transaction. This can not work. Use an XA transaction if you want to enrol heterogeneous resources.

EDIT: From what you've said in the comments, you do not want to enrol the VM endpoint in the transaction, so just enrol the JDBC endpoints as in here:

<transactional action="ALWAYS_BEGIN">
    <jdbc:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response"
        queryKey="insert" queryTimeout="-1" connector-ref="dbConnector"
        doc:name="insert into test values (1, 'Test 1')">
        <jdbc:transaction action="ALWAYS_JOIN" />
        <jdbc:query key="insert"
            value="insert into test values (1, 'Test 1')" />
    </jdbc:outbound-endpoint>
    <jdbc:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response"
        queryKey="insert2" queryTimeout="-1" connector-ref="dbConnector"
        doc:name="insert into test values (2, 'Test 2')">
        <jdbc:transaction action="ALWAYS_JOIN" />
        <jdbc:query key="insert2"
            value="insert into test values (2, 'Test 2')" />
    </jdbc:outbound-endpoint>
</transactional>

This works fine with a one-way inbound endpoint.

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Sorry, but I don't quite get it. I want each flow (thread) to be transactional in itself, I don't want to encompass them all in the same transaction. In Java it is perfectly possible to spawn any number of Threads, each one under its own tx. E.g. an app server attends multiple client requests with no problems. –  pakman Jan 11 '13 at 1:56
    
This is exactly what I'm saying: one thread, one transaction. But Mule guarantees only one thread if the endpoint is request-response. –  David Dossot Jan 11 '13 at 2:16
1  
But you haven't tried the transactional element. I've reviewed my answer: it works for me with it. –  David Dossot Jan 11 '13 at 22:20
1  
Wow, where did you get that <transactional> tag from? It seems to work but: 1. It prints the SQLException twice in the log (either beacause it is retrying... or god knows) 2. Whatever you put inside the tag is no longer visible in Mule Studio. My version seems to behave better. –  pakman Jan 11 '13 at 22:56
1  
I got it from the Eclipse XML editor code assist :D I'm not using Mule Studio. 1. Strange. 2. Now you now why I use plain Eclipse :D –  David Dossot Jan 11 '13 at 23:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I managed to make it work. I had to add an intermediate async flow wich invokes the sync/tx flow:

enter image description here

I think this is ugly and unnecesary and that it would be perfectly ok to invoke it as the original post, but for reasons than are beyond me Mule makes you jump through hoops for this.

Following is the flow's XML:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    <mule>
    <spring:beans>
        <spring:bean id="dataSource" name="dataSource" class="org.enhydra.jdbc.standard.StandardDataSource" destroy-method="shutdown">
            <spring:property name="driverName" value="org.h2.Driver" />
            <spring:property name="url" value="jdbc:h2:tcp://localhost/~/mule" />
            <spring:property name="user" value="sa" />
            <spring:property name="password">
                <spring:value></spring:value>
            </spring:property>
        </spring:bean>

        <spring:bean id="transactionFactory" name="transactionFactory" class="org.mule.transport.jdbc.JdbcTransactionFactory" />

    </spring:beans>

    <jdbc:connector name="dbConnector" dataSource-ref="dataSource" validateConnections="true" queryTimeout="-1" pollingFrequency="0" doc:name="Database" />

    <flow name="triggerFlow" doc:name="triggerFlow">
        <http:inbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" host="localhost" port="8081" doc:name="HTTP" />
        <set-payload value="#[[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]]" doc:name="[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]"/>
        <collection-splitter doc:name="Collection Splitter"/>
        <vm:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="one-way" path="async" doc:name="async" />
    </flow>
    <flow name="simpletransactionFlow1" doc:name="simpletransactionFlow1">
        <vm:inbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="one-way" path="async" doc:name="async"/>
        <vm:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" path="flow" doc:name="flow"/>
    </flow>

    <flow name="flow" doc:name="flow">
        <vm:inbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" path="flow" doc:name="flow">
            <custom-transaction factory-ref="transactionFactory" action="ALWAYS_BEGIN" timeout="10" />
        </vm:inbound-endpoint>
        <logger message="#[groovy:Thread.currentThread().getName()], payload=#[payload]" level="INFO" doc:name="Logger"/>
        <jdbc:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" queryKey="insert" queryTimeout="-1" connector-ref="dbConnector" doc:name="Insert 1">
            <jdbc:transaction action="ALWAYS_JOIN" />
            <jdbc:query key="insert" value="insert into test values (#[payload], 'Test 1')" />
        </jdbc:outbound-endpoint>
        <jdbc:outbound-endpoint exchange-pattern="request-response" queryKey="insert2" queryTimeout="-1" connector-ref="dbConnector" doc:name="Insert 2">
            <jdbc:transaction action="ALWAYS_JOIN" />
            <jdbc:query key="insert2" value="insert into test values (#[payload + 10], 'Test 2')" />
        </jdbc:outbound-endpoint>
    </flow>

</mule>
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I promise my answer is the right one :) Please check it out and amend accepted if you agree! –  Robert Grant Oct 25 '13 at 10:03
    
For the VM to participate in the transaction shouldn't you be using a XA transaction manager ? –  Sudarshan May 7 at 9:19

This is discussed in the Mule documentation. It is a little more cumbersome that it needs to be perhaps, but it's not too bad, and only actually requires one VM Transport, not two:

enter image description here

I changed it because I wanted to use TCP instead of HTTP, but it's basically the same example.

The first flow receives untransacted TCP, does something with it (just a Byte Array To String here, but possibly you'd have validation or something), pushes the input to the VM Connector, then echos the input back to the TCP stream. Returning after the VM Connector guarantees that the TCP source that it can let go of its message, if it's doing a little low-level guaranteed delivery.

The VM Connector is one-way, and has a persistent store connected to it so it can't lose the message. This shows an error in Mule Studio 3.5, but it works fine.

Then the middle flow takes over, and contains a transaction so the VM Connector won't let go of the message unless the business logic subflow completes successfully.

Finally the subflow runs; currently just Thread.sleep()ing for 5 seconds so I can see it's all working. Telnetting in has an instant echo back to the Telnet console, then five seconds later another echo.

Hope that helps! I've only spent a couple of hours with Mule altogether, but this seems to be correct.

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