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I'm confused about how the $ variables work in this part of EventMachine code (strip_op is a String#sub method):

def receive_data(data)
      @buf = @buf ? @buf << data : data

      while (@buf && !@closing)
        case @parse_state
        when AWAITING_CONTROL_LINE
          case @buf
          when PUB_OP
            ctrace('PUB OP', strip_op($&)) if NATSD::Server.trace_flag?
            return connect_auth_timeout if @auth_pending
            @buf = $'
            @parse_state = AWAITING_MSG_PAYLOAD
            @msg_sub, @msg_reply, @msg_size = $1, $3, $4.to_i

What are the meanings for $&, $', $1, etc.?

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closed as too localized by sawa, the Tin Man, Anders R. Bystrup, casperOne Jan 14 '13 at 22:10

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See this: jimneath.org/2010/01/04/… –  Diego Basch Jan 11 '13 at 2:59
    
These are documented here and there around the internets, but their form makes it difficult to search for. Check "Magic $-prefixed variables in Ruby; is there a complete reference somewhere?" and cs.auckland.ac.nz/references/ruby/stdlib/libdoc/English/rdoc/… –  the Tin Man Jan 11 '13 at 3:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Those hold parts of the last regex match. $&: the matched substring, $': the substring that follows the match, $1: the first captured substring of the match.

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Thank you for your answer! –  harryz Jan 14 '13 at 7:10

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