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Let's see this code

1
5
9

i would like to have a perl that will check the sequence number 1 to 9. if the number is exist, it will print the number, else it will print "not exist number". It is a kind of if else inside for loop. The output will be

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Here is my temporary code

#! /usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
while (<>){
  my ($ID) = split;
  for ($index=1; $index<=9; $index++)
  {
    if ($index == $ID)
    {
      print $ID;
      printf("\n");
    }
    elsif ($index != $ID)
    {
      print $index;
    }
    else
    {
      printf ("\n");
    }
  }
}

But my output is

1
234567891234
56789123456789

Any idea?

share|improve this question
    
First of all, the bottom else is never reached, thats y u see 2-9 on one line –  Karthik T Jan 11 '13 at 3:31
2  
Are you looking for good code that solves the original question, even if it uses a different approach? Or mainly to know why your approach isn't working? –  Ken Williams Jan 11 '13 at 3:32
    
I'm looking for good code that solves the original question... –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 4:52

4 Answers 4

Here's a more succinct way to do it:

while (<>) {
  print "$i\n" while ++$i < $_;
  print;
}

I'm assuming you don't need to verify whether the input is truly an increasing sequence of integers. If that might not be true, then you'd also need to decide what to do - either die, or eliminate duplicates, or print a warning, or whatever.

share|improve this answer

You need two loops. First go through your input file and mark the found numbers in some array. Then go through your marks and print them

# mark the numbers
my @found = (0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0);
while (<>) {
    my ($ID) = split;
    $found[$ID] = 1;
}

# print the numbers
for (my $index=1; $index<=9; $index++)
{
    if ($found[$index])
    {
        print "$index\n";
    }
    else
    {
        print "$index does not exist\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In your code, when you match $ID, then you print out a carriage return, otherwise, you will be printing out the number. I'm not sure but the printf may be outputting the carriage return before the print. I would just use print and double quotes to interpret the variable.

The main issues with your script is the logic you have for checking the ID for a match. If you match index you print $ID out, and then if you don't match the index, you print out $index, but with those two condition, I don't see how you would reach the else part of the if statement, unless $ID did not equal $index and equal $index (which is unlikely to happen). I would change the if to be the following:

  if ( $ID == $index ) {
    print "$ID\n";
  }
  else { 
    print "$index does not exist\n";
  }

If your question was concerning why are are getting that particular output, then:

The output from your script would be 1 followed by the carriage return, then 2 though 9 would be printed (together as there is no carriage return output in your ($ID != $index) condition in the elsif) on the next line for the first line read in (which was 1 for input). The when the second line is read in, the script print out 1 to 4 together (no carriage return in the elsif) and seems to print out the carriage return (I suspect 4 was entered instead of 5) followed by 5 to 9. Then when the the last line is read in, the script print out 1 to 8 together (as in previously) then 9 followed by a carriage return.

If you correct your logic, it should give you the results you desire.

Here is what I came up with using your script as a starting point:

use strict;
my $ID;
my $index;
while (<>){
  my ($ID) = split;
  for ($index=1; $index<=9; $index++)
  {
    if ($index == $ID)
    {
      print "$ID\n";
    }
    else
    {
      print "$index does not exist\n";;
    }
  }
  print "\n";
}

and the I get the following output:

1
2 does not exist
3 does not exist
4 does not exist
5 does not exist
6 does not exist
7 does not exist
8 does not exist
9 does not exist

1 does not exist
2 does not exist
3 does not exist
4 does not exist
5
6 does not exist
7 does not exist
8 does not exist
9 does not exist

1 does not exist
2 does not exist
3 does not exist
4 does not exist
5 does not exist
6 does not exist
7 does not exist
8 does not exist
9

Based on the information of what you expect for the output, I hope this helps:

use strict;
my $ID;
# Initialized the index to be 1
my $index = 1;
while (<>){
  my ($ID) = split;

  while (( $ID != $index ) && 
     ( $ID < 10)) 
  {
    print "$index does not exist\n";
$index++;
  }
  print "$ID\n";
  $index++;
}

__DATA__
1
5
6

and the the output I get is:

1
2 does not exist
3 does not exist
4 does not exist
5
6 does not exist
7 does not exist
8 does not exist
9

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
But it still give me 123456789123456789123456789... How? –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 4:59
    
Did you get the \n inside of the double quotes for both print statements? –  Glenn Jan 11 '13 at 5:01
    
ya... actually the\n is not a problem But the problem is the result prints 3 times 1 to 9. –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 5:07
    
Hum. 3 times would be from the three lines of inputs. I added to the answer the modifications I made to your script. It is possible I am not sure what you are asking. What would your expected output be from the script given the inputs? –  Glenn Jan 11 '13 at 5:13
    
Given the input is 1\n5\n\9, my expected output is 1\n2\n3\n4\n5\n6\n7\n8\n9 –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 5:27

You get those results because your have the inner for loop. The inner loop is executed from the start for each line in the input. I modified the code slightly:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $index = 1;
while ($index < 10) {
  my $ID = <DATA>;
  $ID = 10 if not defined $ID;
  chomp $ID;
  if ($ID > $index) {
    while ($index < $ID) {
      printf ("Not Found: %d\n", $index++); 
    }   
  }
  if ($index == $ID)
  {
    print "$ID\n" if $ID < 10;
  }
  $index++;
}

__DATA__
1
5
6

Your original code reads a line:

while (<>){
  my ($ID) = split;

Then starts the loop:

  for ($index=1; $index<=9; $index++)
  {

and thinks that you are missing numbers up to the new value of $ID.

share|improve this answer
    
if given $ID need to read from txt file, do I need to change the code to <pre> use strict; use warnings; my $index = 1; while ($index < 10) { my ($ID) = split; chomp $ID; if ($ID > $index) { while ($index < $ID) { printf ("Not Found: %d\n", $index++); } } if ($index == $ID) { print "$ID\n"; } $index++; } <code> –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 5:31
    
Just change my $ID = <DATA>; to my $ID = <>; –  perreal Jan 11 '13 at 5:32
    
But it only prints 1 –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 5:36
    
are you missing some part? –  perreal Jan 11 '13 at 5:38
    
it is working.. thank you... –  Toni Yap Jan 11 '13 at 5:42

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