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public class AAA {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer bbb, aaa = new Integer(5);
        System.out.print(aaa);
        bbb = aaa;
        System.out.print(bbb);
        aaa = 4;  
        System.out.print(aaa);
        System.out.print(bbb);
    }
}

Why as a result I see: 5545 instead of 5544?

*java version "1.7.0_10"

Thank to all, I understood my mistake.

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Why Integer instead of int here? –  Matt Ball Jan 11 '13 at 3:45
    
Because I want so. It is example –  CoNDoR Jan 11 '13 at 3:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
public class AAA {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer bbb, aaa = new Integer(5);
        System.out.print(aaa);
        bbb = aaa;

The above line assigns bbb and aaa to point to the same object.

        System.out.print(bbb);
        aaa = 4;  

Now aaa points to a new object (which is created invisibly by autoboxing). This does not change the value of the original object which bbb still points to. Note that Integer is immutable. This means it is impossible to change the value of an Integer object. You can only a create new Integer object with a different value.

        System.out.print(aaa);
        System.out.print(bbb);
    }
}
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Thanks for the explanation! But if I need to have two variables that point to the same object and update the value of this object. How to do this? –  CoNDoR Jan 11 '13 at 4:01
1  
@user1968765 In order to be able to update the value of an object, you need an object whose class supports updating. Integer is immutable - an Integer object has no value-changing methods. –  Patricia Shanahan Jan 11 '13 at 4:02
1  
@CoNDoR Integer doesn't allow this since it is immutable; there is absolutely no way to update the value of an Integer object (at least without circumventing Java entirely). On the other hand, there are many other classes in the Java API which are not. For example, if two references point to the same List and you use one to add or remove elements from the list, then the changes are reflected in the second reference (since they both point to the same List object). Similarly, you can easily write your own class which provides methods that modify internal values. –  Code-Apprentice Jan 11 '13 at 16:40
    
@CoNDoR So the short answer is, if you need an Integer-like class that allows you to update the value, you need to write your own to get this behavior –  Code-Apprentice Jan 11 '13 at 16:45

aaa = 4; means that aaa = new Integer(4); due to autoboxing and it means aaa and bbb will refer to different objects after that assignment.

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Assigning to a reference variable changes what, if anything, it points to. In order to change the value of an object, so that the change is visible through two or more different references, you need an object whose class supports value changes. Integer does not. StringBuffer does:

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringBuffer a = new StringBuffer();
    StringBuffer b = a;
    a.append("Hello, world");
    System.out.println(b);
  }
}

The a.append call changes the content of the StringBuffer that both a and b reference.

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bbb does not change with aaa. You would have to re-define bbb as aaa right below the line aaa = 4; if you wanted the program to print 5544.

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Setting bbb to aaa does not mean that bbb is updated when aaa is re-assigned later (aaa = 4).

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Because, in Java objects are defined as call by reference and types are defined as call by value.

If you change it to int bbb, aaa = 5; the result will go back to what you expect.

This is because an Integer is an object, and an int is a type.

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