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How would one use rollapply (or some other R function) to grow the window size as the function progresses though the data. To phrase it another way, the first apply works with the first element, the second with the first two elements, the third with the first three elements etc.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are looking to apply min , max, sum or prod, these functions already exist as

cummin, cummax, cumsum and cumprod

For more exotic functions you can simply use sapply

eg

# your vector of interest
x <- c(1,2,3,4,5)

sapply(seq_along(x), function(y,n) yourfunction(y[seq_len(n)]), y = x)

For a basic zoo object

x.Date <- as.Date("2003-02-01") + c(1, 3, 7, 9, 14) - 1
x <- zoo(rnorm(5), x.Date)

# cumsum etc will work and return a zoo object
cs.zoo <- cumsum(x)

# convert back to zoo for the `sapply` solution
# here `sum`
foo.zoo <- zoo(sapply(seq_along(x), function(n,y) sum(y[seq_len(n)]), y= x), index(x))


identical(cs.zoo, foo.zoo)
## [1] TRUE
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Thanks for your answer, how could I get this to work with zoo objects? –  Craig Jan 11 '13 at 4:26
    
see the edit... –  mnel Jan 11 '13 at 4:33
    
Cool, thanks again. –  Craig Jan 11 '13 at 4:35
    
@Craig . I think it's been long enough. You should accept an answer. –  Wilmer Henao Feb 7 at 15:15

in addition to @mnel's answer:

For more exotic functions you can simply use sapply

and if the sapply approach takes too long, you may be better off formulating your function iteratively.

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From peering at the documentation at ?zooapply I think this will do what you want, where a is your matrix and sum can be any function:

a <- cbind(1:5,1:5)
#      [,1] [,2]
# [1,]    1    1
# [2,]    2    2
# [3,]    3    3
# [4,]    4    4
# [5,]    5    5
rollapply(a,width=seq_len(nrow(a)),sum,align="right")
#      [,1] [,2]
# [1,]    1    1
# [2,]    3    3
# [3,]    6    6
# [4,]   10   10
# [5,]   15   15

But mnel's answer seems sufficient and more generalizable.

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