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This is the json object I am working with

{
    "name": "John Smith",
    "age": 32,
    "employed": true,
    "address": {
        "street": "701 First Ave.",
        "city": "Sunnyvale, CA 95125",
        "country": "United States"
    },
    "children": [
        {
            "name": "Richard",
            "age": 7
        },
        {
            "name": "Susan",
            "age": 4
        },
        {
            "name": "James",
            "age": 3
        }
    ]
}

I want this as another key-value pair :

"collegeId": {
                      "eventno": "6062",
                      "eventdesc": "abc"
                                            }; 

I tried concat but that gave me the result with || symbol and I cdnt iterate. I used spilt but that removes only commas.

concattedjson = JSON.stringify(JSON.parse(json1).concat(JSON.parse(json2)));

How do I add a key pair value to an existing json object ? I am working in javascript.

share|improve this question
    
@Aaush, does json1 contain the object described in the first code example? – Jonathan M Jan 11 '13 at 5:23
    
@JonathanM Yes it contains the object described in the first code – Aayush Jan 11 '13 at 6:18
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is the easiest way and it's working to me.

var testJson = {
        "name": "John Smith",
        "age": 32,
        "employed": true,
        "address": {
            "street": "701 First Ave.",
            "city": "Sunnyvale, CA 95125",
            "country": "United States"
        },
        "children": [
            {
                "name": "Richard",
                "age": 7
            },
            {
                "name": "Susan",
                "age": 4
            },
            {
                "name": "James",
                "age": 3
            }
        ]
    };
    testJson.collegeId = {"eventno": "6062","eventdesc": "abc"};
share|improve this answer
    
You could simplify the last two lines to just: testJson.collegeId ={"eventno": "6062","eventdesc": "abc"}; – Jonathan M Jan 11 '13 at 15:32
    
yes that's actually the best and most simplified way :) – Jobert Enamno Jan 11 '13 at 15:44

Just convert the JSON string to an object using JSON.parse() and then add the property. If you need it back into a string, do JSON.stringify().

BTW, there's no such thing as a JSON object. There are objects, and there are JSON strings that represent those objects.

share|improve this answer
    
    
The OP did not ask how to convert a string into an object, they asked how to extend the object. Perhaps you should edit your answer. – Travis J Jan 11 '13 at 5:17
1  
@Travis, yes, there are JSON objects, but not like the OP is thinking of them. JSON objects are objects created by the JSON library in order to have properties like .parse() and .stringify(). – Jonathan M Jan 11 '13 at 5:20

You need to make an object at reference "collegeId", and then for that object, make two more key value pairs there like this:

var concattedjson = JSON.parse(json1);
concattedjson["collegeId"] = {};
concattedjson["collegeId"]["eventno"] = "6062";
concattedjson["collegeId"]["eventdesc"] = "abc";

Assuming that concattedjson is your json object. If you only have a string representation you will need to parse it first before you extend it.

Edit

demo for those who think this will not work.

share|improve this answer
    
If your concattedjson is the same as the OP's, this won't work. His is a string. – Jonathan M Jan 11 '13 at 5:16
    
@JonathanM - Perhaps you should read the link I posted for you. It is a JSON Object, and yes, they do exist. – Travis J Jan 11 '13 at 5:17
    
I get what you're saying in the comment on my answer, and I clarified. Your answer here still won't work on his JSON string. – Jonathan M Jan 11 '13 at 5:21
    
@JonathanM - See edits for a working demo. – Travis J Jan 11 '13 at 5:23
    
the reason this won't work is the OP's concattedjson is a string. A string is the result of the .stringify() method. Your fiddle assumes it's already an object. In fact, your fiddle doesn't involve any JSON at all. It just involves an object. – Jonathan M Jan 11 '13 at 5:25

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