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I came across this question in a coding competition-

You're given an array of positive integers and are allowed to change the sign of any of the integers whenever you require. Write a program to calculate the minimum sum of this array. This sum should be >= 0. For example : Array = {1,2,4,5} then sum = 0 as we change sign of 1 and 5 {-1,2,4,-5}

My solution to the problem was to sort the array and find the sum of all the members. I would then iteratively decrease 2*(sorted array value) from the sum-starting from the largest number - till sum becomes 0 or till it becomes negative.

But my solution is wrong. Take 12,13,14,15,16,50. My code would change 50 to -50 and stop (i.e min sum = 20). But the answer should be 12,-13,-14,-15,-16,50 (min sum = 4)

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Is performance any criterion ? If not, I would just create two iterative loops ( crude way ) and get the best answer. – Deepak Jan 11 '13 at 5:57
    
Umm, there were some test cases with large inputs, where the time limit would be exceeded using your method. – user1968919 Jan 11 '13 at 6:06
    
Was this on topcoder ? a tricky one though :) .. UpVoting it – Deepak Jan 11 '13 at 6:09
    
@Deepak Nope, online round for interview of a company :) – user1968919 Jan 12 '13 at 14:03

this problem can be changed to a knap-sack problem

consider this problem:

you are given n integers, and obviously, you can calculate the sum of these number, suppose it is S

you are now required to choose a set of numbers from them, and aims to sum these chosen numbers to be as close to S/2 as possible

this can be done using a DP algorithm which is very similar to knap-sack problem

can you do it now? :)

this post is just a hint, if you need more help, i can give more details

share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution songlj! Thanks a lot! (Would have upvoted it, but I don't have the min. reputation for it :D). Btw, how do you generally approach such problems? – user1968919 Jan 12 '13 at 14:02
1  
well, i dont know the GENERAL method. maybe it is because i used to practise a lot of similar problems before. i think one way you can start with is jump out of the question and try to see whether some methods which you are familiar with can be adapted to it. – songlj Jan 13 '13 at 2:45

I wrote the above code and it seems to be working.

Correct me if I am wrong!

public int minimumSum(int[] array)
{
      int counter1, counter2, minimumSum;
      int n = array.length;
      counter1 = array[n-1];
      counter2 = array[n-2];
      // It is assumed that the array is sorted.
      int i = n-3;
      while(i>=0)
      {
          if(counter1 > counter2)
          { 
              counter2 = counter2 + array[i];
          }
          else
          {
              counter1 = counter1 + array[i];
          }
          i--;
      }
      if(counter1 > counter2)
      {
          minimumSum = counter1 - counter2;
      }
      else
          minimumSum = counter2 - counter1;
      return minimumSum ;
}
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I have mentioned in the algorithm, that I assume the array to be sorted. Hence if you have [1,1,1,1,4] the answer would be correct ! – Augustus Aug 12 '14 at 5:13
    
You are right. I just didn't see the comment. – AbcAeffchen Aug 12 '14 at 5:25

I was irritated by the other answers, saying something about knap-sack.

It is not something like Knap-Sack.

Knap-Sack means you have a target S and a list of weights A and you are looking for a subset of A that sums up to S.

Your problem is much easier, since you know you have to take all numbers and just alter the sign of some.

So you can think about it as two stacks and you try to minimize the diffrence of their height. This is the offline scheduling problem and it is solveable by a greedyalgorithm. For a code example see Augustus' answer.

  • Sort the list (max to min)
  • for each object, lay it on the stack with the lowest height

You get your solution by turning the sign of all objects on the smaller stack negative suming the nubers up. (i.e. computing the absolut difference of the both stacks)

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Sorting won't work here because this cannot be solved by Greedy approach just like in 0-1 Knapsack. You can think this way, every element in the array has 2 choices either be negative or positive. You can develop a recursive solution by either selecting a number (one branch) or not selecting it (the other branch)

Here's an implementation of what I was saying. The code can be improved in several ways. Sorry if it has very less comments. I am running short of time.

#include "iostream"
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

int *arr,*flag,mini=1000; int* sol; //Flag array is used to see which all elements are selected in that call of the function

void find_difference(int* arr,int* flag,int n,int current,int *sol)
{
if(current==n)return;

int sum0=0, sum1=0,entered=0;
flag[current]=1;              //Selecting the current indexed number
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
    if(flag[i]==0)
    {
        sum0=sum0+arr[i];
    }
    else
    {
        sum1=sum1+arr[i];
    }
}
    if(abs(sum0-sum1)<mini)
    {
        mini=abs(sum0-sum1);
        for (int j = 0; j < n; ++j)
        {
            sol[j]=flag[j];    //Remebering the optimal solution
        }
    }
find_difference(arr,flag,n,current+1,sol);  //Moving to the next index to perform the same operation (selecting or not selecting it)
flag[current]=0;                 // Not selecting it
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
    if(flag[i]==0)
    {
        sum0=sum0+arr[i];
    }
    else
    {
        sum1=sum1+arr[i];
    }
}
    if(abs(sum0-sum1) < mini)
    {
        mini=abs(sum0-sum1);
        for (int j = 0; j < n; ++j)
        {
            sol[j]=flag[j];
        }
    }
find_difference(arr,flag,n,current+1,sol);
}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
int n;
cout<<"Enter size: ";
cin>>n;
cout<<"Enter the numbers: "
arr= new int[n];
flag= new int[n];
sol= new int[n];
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
    cin>>arr[i];
    flag[i]=0;
    sol[i]=0;
}

find_difference(arr,flag,n,0,sol);

cout<<"Min = "<<mini<<endl;
cout<<"One set is: ";
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
    if (sol[i]==1)
    {
        cout<<arr[i]<<" ";
    }
}
cout<<"\nOther set is: ";
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
    if (sol[i]==0)
    {
        cout<<arr[i]<<" ";
    }
}
cout<<"\n";
return 0;
}
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1  
The complexity here is O(2^n), which can be reduced by DP. – Shivendra Nov 15 '13 at 13:01

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