Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running a query in SQL Server to count the number of unique email addresses that exist in our database by Australian State. However, when I try to reconcile the numbers to make sure they are right I've noticed a discrepancy which makes me think my query isn't right. Here are the queries I'm using to reconcile the numbers and the actual results:

/** Count the total number of active members (status=1) since last night **/
SELECT count(distinct(email)) Total FROM [member] WHERE status = 1 
AND (created_datetime <= '2013-01-11' OR created_datetime IS NULL)
/** RESULT: 8958 **/

/** Count the number of active members (status=1) who live in Victoria since last night **/
SELECT count(distinct(email)) Total FROM [member] WHERE status = 1 
AND (created_datetime <= '2013-01-11' OR created_datetime IS NULL)
AND [state] = 'vic'
/** RESULT: 7545 **/

/** Count the number of active members (status=1) who don't live in Victoria since last night **/
SELECT count(distinct(email)) Total FROM [member] WHERE status = 1 
AND (created_datetime <= '2013-01-11' OR created_datetime IS NULL)
AND [state] <> 'vic'
/** RESULT:1446 **/

/** Add the two results to see how they compare to the total **/
SELECT 7545+1446
/** RESULT:8991 **/

You'll notice that the total number of distinct emails is 8958, but if you add those that live in Victoria and those that don't live in Victoria the number is 8991 which is different. Am I using the count distinct function wrongly?

share|improve this question
    
<= '2013-01-10 23:59:59' - so you don't want to include any that occurred during the last second of the day? It's almost always better (with date queries) to use exclusive end points for periods - e.g. < '20130111'. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '13 at 6:35
    
Good point. I've updated the query and I'll edit my question above –  Craig Myles Jan 13 '13 at 22:15

4 Answers 4

The created_datetime in the where clause is different. In the first query it is

WHERE status = 1 
AND (created_datetime <= '2013-01-10 23:59:59' OR created_datetime IS NULL)

for the other two queries it is

WHERE status = 1 
AND (created_datetime <= '2013-01-31 00:00:00' OR created_datetime IS NULL)
AND [state] <> 'vic'

Raj

share|improve this answer
    
Good spot. I've updated the query and amended my question. However the results are the same (mainly because both dates were in the future when I wrote the question) –  Craig Myles Jan 13 '13 at 22:18

On top of the answers provided by @Raj and @MarkD, I want to add another observation.
Shouldn't the

OR created_datetime IS NULL

be in only one of the statements and not both? If it is in both, there will be duplicates and the result of the "total" query will never match the sum of the individual queries.

share|improve this answer
    
@oragecrush is right to me, coz on all the query we are getting repeatation of created_datetime = NULL –  brykneval Jan 11 '13 at 6:28
    
Ok so I tried running the test again twice - removing "OR created_datetime IS NULL" from the "who lives in Victoria" query in one test, and removing the same statement from the "who doesn't live in Victoria" query in the second and the numbers still don't add up unfortunately. –  Craig Myles Jan 13 '13 at 22:28
    
One thing to note... If I remove OR created_datetime IS NULL from all of the queries and run the test, the numbers add up. But I guess this isn't much use to me as it ignores a massive subset of my users –  Craig Myles Jan 13 '13 at 23:32
    
There might be duplicate emails? If the same email has been entered for a member from 'vic' and one for another state, then there are bound to be duplicates. If the point of the exercise is to tally the individual counts against the total, why don't you remove the distinct and count the whole email list? That should give you a match. –  Orangecrush Jan 14 '13 at 3:42
    
In theory any duplicate members should reside in the same state, but I can't guarantee this. There are definitely duplicate emails. The main point of the exercise is to compile a report that shows the number of unique members, and then all breakdowns (by state, then gender, then age) should all tally up to this total. But at the moment they don't, so I compiled the example above just to demonstrate this on the web. I'm at a bit of a loss about what to do –  Craig Myles Jan 14 '13 at 22:50

You are counting distinct emails. If a user from Victoria has an email identical to that of a user from elsewhere, those would count as 1 in the total count.

When counting Victoria and non-Victoria emails separately, both would again count as 1 in each case, giving you the total of 2 (if you dare to add them up), which would be the very discrepancy you are having now.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a very valid point Andriy. Is there any way to show the following then: A total of all users (from all states, or those with no state), then a breakdown of users in each state (with a separate column for those with no state)? The total should be reconcile to the sum of the breakdown –  Craig Myles Jan 14 '13 at 22:54
    
Perhaps you want something like SELECT state, COUNT(*) FROM member GROUP BY state? –  Andriy M Jan 14 '13 at 23:32

The balance of your [State]s might be NULL And as Raj points out, the DATETIME on your queries differs.

SELECT count(distinct(email)) Total FROM [member] WHERE status = 1 
AND (created_datetime <= '2013-01-31 00:00:00' OR created_datetime IS NULL)
AND [state] IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
If I run SELECT count(distinct(email)) Total FROM [Staging-vPowerClub].[dbo].[member] WHERE AND [state] IS NULL it returns 0 results, so all entries have an associated [state] –  Craig Myles Jan 13 '13 at 22:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.