Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Solving a very simple exercise in Prolog: print all numbers from 1 to 100, but instead of the number, print 'Fuzz' if number is a multiple of 3, 'Buzz' if multiple of 5, and 'FizzBuzz' if both.

I ended up doing the following:

fizzbuzz :- forall( between(1, 100, X), fizzbuzz(X) ).
fizzbuzz(X) :- ( write_fb(X) ; write_n(X) ), nl.

write_fb(X) :- bagof(_, fb(X), _).
fb(X) :- X rem 3 =:= 0, write('Fizz').
fb(X) :- X rem 5 =:= 0, write('Buzz').

write_n(X) :- write(X).

but isn't there any predicate or a control structure that would avoid using bagof/3 only for its side effect? (I am always a bit unsure with using predicates only for the side effects).

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

You can use sort of pattern matching :

fizzbuzz :-
    forall( between(1, 100, X), fizzbuzz(X) ).
fizzbuzz(X) :-
    0 is X rem 15,
    format('~w FizzBuzz~n', [X]).

fizzbuzz(X) :-
    0 is X rem 5,
    format('~w Buzz~n', [X]).

fizzbuzz(X) :-
    0 is X mod 3,
    format('~w Fizz~n', [X]).

fizzbuzz(X) :-
    write(X), nl.
share|improve this answer
    
I considered doing it like this, but I guess I was looking for a general solution for the following situation: try all possible solutions to a goal, or revert to a default if none fits. The more I think about it the more it seems that bagof/3 and a semicolon is a perfectly fine way of doing it. Your solution works in this case, but it is specific to this problem only. –  Boris Jan 11 '13 at 9:00

Well, you are already using it; forall/2:

write_fb(X) :-
    forall(fb(X), true).

Alternatively, you can change your representation of the problem:

write_fb(X) :-
  (X rem 3 =:= 0 -> write('Fizz') ; true),
  (X rem 5 =:= 0 -> write('Buzz') ; true).

Of course, in this case, using bagof/3 and friends is fine since the generated list is very small.

share|improve this answer
    
I also suggested using forall, but I was wrong: consider that bagof fails when there are no soultions... –  CapelliC Jan 11 '13 at 11:24
    
forall does something different; as for using conditions... not really clean and general enough. As I said already in response to the other answer, I think bagof is actually exactly what I am looking for: create all solutions or fail if there is no solution. The problem I had with using a side effect instead of collecting the result is, I suppose, that Prolog predicates are not meant to be used for their side effects, normally. Thank you for answering anyway! –  Boris Jan 11 '13 at 12:09

aggregate(count, fb(X), C) allows to count solutions, but is based on bagof, thus builds the list just to count the elements. Then I wrote a reusable 'building block', predating call_nth/2, from this @false answer

:- meta_predicate count_solutions(0, ?).

count_solutions(Goal, C) :-
    State = count(0, _), % note the extra argument which remains a variable
    (   Goal,
        arg(1, State, C1),
        C2 is C1 + 1,
        nb_setarg(1, State, C2),
        fail
    ;   arg(1, State, C)
    ).

the 'applicative' code become

:- use_module(uty, [count_solutions/2]).

fizzbuzz :- forall( between(1, 100, X), fizzbuzz(X) ).
fizzbuzz(X) :-
    ( count_solutions(fb(X), 0) -> write(X) ; true ), nl.

fb(X) :- X rem 3 =:= 0, write('Fizz').
fb(X) :- X rem 5 =:= 0, write('Buzz').
share|improve this answer
    
You are not counting solutions but answers. –  false Jan 13 '13 at 21:40

My esteemed collegues have answered, but you want 'between'.

You don't need to collect the solutions. In that your intuition is correct. I suspect you started with something like

fizzbuzz :-  between(1, 100, N),
             fb(N).


fb(N) :-  N rem 5 =:= 0,  
          N rem 3 =:= 0,
          write(fizzbuzz).

fb(N) :-  N rem 5 =:= 0,    
          write(buzz).

fb(N) :-  N rem 3 =:= 0,
          write(fizz).

fb(N) :-  write(N).

the problem with this is that fb isn't 'steadfast' - you don't expect it to offer you multiple solutions, but it does - for example, fb(15) unifies with every fb rule.

The solution is to force it to be steadfast, using a cut:

fizzbuzz :-  between(1, 100, N),
             fb(N).


fb(N) :-  N rem 5 =:= 0,  
          N rem 3 =:= 0,
          !,
          write(fizzbuzz).

fb(N) :-  N rem 5 =:= 0,
          !,    
          write(buzz).

fb(N) :-  N rem 3 =:= 0,
          !,
          write(fizz).

fb(N) :-  write(N).
share|improve this answer
    
The notion of steadfastness and steadfast are well established in Prolog, but they mean something different. –  false Jan 13 '13 at 14:01
    
Really? Can you amplify on that? I thought steadfast meant 'ok to backtrack into' –  Anniepoo Jan 13 '13 at 17:45
    
Steadfastness was coined by O'Keefe in 1987. See the PROLOG Digest of 1987-10-02, Vol. 5 : 71. I have been searching it without success with google. Seems google has removed postings of that time... The notion has gathered some interest recently due to the need of a precise definition for ISO/IEC (WD)TR 13211-3. See: these comments for a definition and these documents of WG17. –  false Jan 13 '13 at 20:40
    
Sorry, perhaps I'm being dense here. I know there's a current discussion of steadfast in phrase/3 but not sure how it's relevant to my use of the word. –  Anniepoo Jan 14 '13 at 1:20

Me...I'd do something like:

fizzbuzz( X , Y ) :-
  X =< Y ,
  R3 is X % 3 ,
  R5 is X % 5 ,
  map( R3 , R5 , X , V ) ,
  write(V) ,
  nl ,
  X1 is X+1 ,
  fizzbuzz( X1 , Y )
  .

map( 0 , 0 , _ , fizzbuzz ) :- ! .
map( 0 , _ , _ , fizz     ) :- ! .
map( _ , 0 , _ , buzz     ) :- ! .
map( _ , _ , X , X        ) :- ! .
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.