Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
void ABC()
{
    var foo = Substitute.For<IFoo>();
    foo.When(x => x.Bar()).Do(x => counter++);
    <use Bar()>.... 1
    foo.When(x => x.Bar()).Do(x => counter--);
    <use Bar()>.... 2
}

For the above code snippet both (1) and (2) are displaying the counter++ behavior indicating that the When...Do behavior is not getting overridden. I need this behavior for generating my testing scenario where I want to hookup different callbacks.

How should I achieve this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Do callback does not get replaced, but both should execute. For example (using NSub 1.4.3.0):

var counter = 0;
var sub = Substitute.For<IFoo>();
sub.When(x => x.Bar()).Do(x => counter++);
sub.Bar();
Console.WriteLine(counter);  // prints 1
sub.When(x => x.Bar()).Do(x => counter--);
sub.Bar();
Console.WriteLine(counter);  // prints 1, as counter gets inc'd to 2, then dec'd to 1

I suggest that When..Do be used sparingly, as its use can be a symptom of failed encapsulation. Forcing behaviour into a substituted object can indicate that the class we are testing has deep coupling to the behaviour of a dependent class, rather than the interface we are substituting for.

With that disclaimer, one way you can swap out callbacks is to use a helper class to supply the specific callback:

[Test]
public void Example() {
    var counter = 0;
    var helper = new CallbackHelper();
    helper.Callback = x => counter++;
    var sub = Substitute.For<IFoo>();

    sub.When(x => x.Bar()).Do(x => helper.Callback(x));
    sub.Bar();
    Console.WriteLine(counter);

    helper.Callback = x => counter--;
    sub.Bar();
    Console.WriteLine(counter);

    helper.Callback = x => { counter = (counter+1) * 10; };
    sub.Bar();
    Console.WriteLine(counter);
}

public class CallbackHelper {
    public Action<CallInfo> Callback;
}

/* Prints:
    1
    0
    10
*/

If you post the specific example of behaviour-swapping you are trying to achieve, we may be able to come up with an interface change to avoid the use of this altogether.

Hope this helps. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the reply. I figured that coupling thing myself and fixed it. But I am really glad to see my decision validated. And thanks for sharing the way to do it. Though as you have suggested I will try to avoid such a scenario. –  Anupam Jan 13 '13 at 6:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.