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I need to find the factors of a given number , e.g :

?- divisors2(40,R).
R = [40,20,10,8,5,4,2,1].

The code :

% get all the numbers between 1-X 
range(I,I,[I]).
range(I,K,[I|L]) :- I < K, I1 is I + 1, range(I1,K,L).
% calc the modulo of each element with the given number :
% any x%y=0 would be considered as part of the answer 
divisors1([],[],_).
divisors1([H|T],S,X):-divisors1(T,W,X),Z is X mod H,Z==0,S=[H|W].
divisors1([_|T],S,X):-divisors1(T,S,X).
divisors2(X,Result) :-range(1,X,Result1),divisors1(Result1,Result,X).

But when I run divisors2(40,RR). I get infinite loop and nothing is presented to the screen.

Why ?

Regards

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand Prolog too well, but as a wild guess: does your program perhaps divide by 1 and call itself recursively? –  Frank Schmitt Jan 11 '13 at 7:32
    
@FrankSchmitt: Divides - yes , but not by 1 , but by each element that is listed between [1.....GivenNumber] , and only then it calls recursively ..... there are two recursions here. –  ron Jan 11 '13 at 7:35
    
Your range does not work properly it seems: –  Boris Jan 11 '13 at 8:05
    
Which Prolog do you use ? Can you trace your code ? –  joel76 Jan 11 '13 at 8:19
    
@joel76: SWI-Prolog version 6.2.5 by Jan Wielemaker (jan@swi-prolog.org) –  ron Jan 11 '13 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a bug here

divisors1([H|T],S,X):-
   divisors1(T,W,X),
   Z is X mod H,
   Z==0,S=[H|W]. <=== here

If Z is Zero then S = [H|W] else S = W.

share|improve this answer
    
but how can I use if-then-else in Prolog in one single line ? –  ron Jan 11 '13 at 8:44
1  
( Z == 0 -> S = [H | W]; S = W). Brackets are important. –  joel76 Jan 11 '13 at 8:55
    
Much appreciated ! +1 & chosen ! –  ron Jan 11 '13 at 9:10
1  
Now, you can improve your code : when you know that Z is equal to 0, you get 2 divisors H and X div H. –  joel76 Jan 11 '13 at 11:30
    
Yeap ,works great ,thanks again ! –  ron Jan 11 '13 at 12:05

You are asking why you get an infinite loop for the query divisors2(40,R). I almost wanted to explain this to you using a . Alas ...

... the answer is: No, you don't get an infinite loop! And your program also finds an answer. It's

R = [1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 20, 40]

which looks reasonable to me. They are in ascending order, and you wanted a descending list, but apart from that, that is a perfect answer. No kidding. However, I suspect that you were not patient enough to get the answer. For 36 I needed:

?- time(divisors2(36,R)).
% 10,744,901,605 inferences, 2248.800 CPU in 2252.918 seconds (100% CPU, 4778061 Lips)
R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36]

Quite unusual ... for a list with at most 36 meager integers Prolog needed 10 744 901 605 inferences, that is less than 234. Does this ring a bell? In any case, there are problems with your program. In fact, there are two quite independent problems. How can we find them?

Maybe we are looking at the wrong side. Just go back to the query. Our first error was how we used Prolog's toplevel. We were very impressed to get an answer. But Prolog offered us further answers! In fact:

?- time(divisors2(36,R)).
% 10,744,901,605 inferences, 2248.800 CPU in 2252.918 seconds (100% CPU, 4778061 Lips)
R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36] ;
% 10 inferences, 0.000 CPU in 0.000 seconds (82% CPU, 455892 Lips)
R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18] ;
% 917,508 inferences, 0.192 CPU in 0.192 seconds (100% CPU, 4789425 Lips)
R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 36] ...

This gets too tedious. Maybe a tiny example suffices?

?- divisors2(6,R).
R = [1, 2, 3, 6] ;
R = [1, 2, 3] ;
R = [1, 2, 6] ;
R = [1, 2] ;
R = [1, 3, 6] ;
R = [1, 3] ;
R = [1, 6] ;
R = [1] ;
R = [2, 3, 6] ;
R = [2, 3] ;
R = [2, 6] ;
R = [2] ;
R = [3, 6] ;
R = [3] ;
R = [6] ;
R = [] ;
false.

More than enough! Maybe we stick to the minimal example [] and restate it:

?- divisors2(6,[]).
true ;
false.

Clearly, that's not what we expected. We wanted this to fail. How to localize the problem? There is one general debugging strategy in Prolog:

If a goal is too general, specialize the program.

We can specialize the program by adding further goals such that above query still succeeds. I will add false and some (=)/2 goals. false is particularly interesting because it wipes out an entire clause:

?- divisors2(6,[]).

range(I,I,[I]) :- I = 6.
range(I,K,[I|L]) :- K = 6,
   I < K,
   I1 is I + 1,
   range(I1,K,L).

divisors1([],[],X) :- K=6.
divisors1([H|T],S,X):- false,
   divisors1(T,W,X),
   Z is X mod H,
   Z=0,
   S=[H|W].
divisors1([_|T],S,X):- S = [], X = 6,
   divisors1(T,S,X).

divisors2(X,Result) :- X = 6, Result = [].
   range(1,X,Result1),
   divisors1(Result1,Result,X).

Somewhere in the remaining part something is too general! In fact the recursive rule of divisors1/3 is too general. This new modified program of yours is called a slice that is a specialization of our original program.

Several ways to fix this, the most naive way is to add the corresponding condition like so:

divisors1([],[],_).
divisors1([H|T],S,X):-
   divisors1(T,W,X),
   0 =:= X mod H,
   S=[H|W].
divisors1([H|T],S,X):-
   divisors1(T,S,X),
   0 =\= X mod H.

However, the performance of the program did not improve. To see this, I will again specialize this program:

divisors1([],[],_) :- false.
divisors1([H|T],S,X):-
   divisors1(T,W,X), false,
   0 =:= X mod H,
   S=[H|W].
divisors1([H|T],S,X):-
   divisors1(T,S,X), false,
   0 =\= X mod H.

Thus: No matter what is there behind the false, this program will try at least 3 * 2^N inferences for a list of length N.

By putting the recursive goals last we can avoid this.

share|improve this answer
    
+10000 for your answer ! –  ron Jan 12 '13 at 5:44
    
It is very good to have experts like you on StackOverflow! –  Sebastian Godelet May 12 at 7:24

If you correct your range (use a cut for the end-of-recursion clause), you will get it sort of working. You do not immediately succeed upon finding all divisors though.

A solution using your general idea, but also built-ins between/3 and bagof/3 (to make typing a bit easier):

divisors(X, Divs) :- bagof(D, divs(X,D), Divs).
divs(X,D) :- between(1,X,D), 0 is X mod D.

Please note that this solution returns the divisors in increasing order.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks ,but I'd like to do that without the built-ins (you know - HW ) but +1 for the help . –  ron Jan 11 '13 at 8:40
1  
@ron: if I were you, I would try correctly implementing bagof/3 and between/3 then. It is not difficult and there are solutions available by people that are way better at Prolog than me :) (or at least good enough to write textbooks on the subject) –  Boris Jan 11 '13 at 9:04

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