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Not sure if this has been answered already but a quick search didn't turn up a satisfying result..
I'm stuck with the following scenario:

  • web service with REST API and JSON formatted data blobs
  • android client app talking to this service and locally caching / processing the data

The we service is run by a German company so some of the strings in the result data contain special characters like German umlauts:

// example resonse
[
    {
         "title" : "reward 1",
         "description" : "Ein gro\u00dfer Kaffee f\u00fcr dich!"
    },
    {
         "title" : "reward 2",
         "description" : "Eine Pizza f\u00fcr dich!"
    },
    ...
]

Locally the app is parsing the data using a set of classes which mirror the response objects (e.g. Reward and RewardResponse classes for the upper example). Each of these classes can read and dump itself from / to JSON - however this is where things get ugly.

Taking the example above org.json will correctly parse the data and the resulting strings will contain proper Unicode versions of the special characters 'ß' (\u00df) and 'ü' (\u00fc).

final RewardResponse response = new RewardResponse(jsonData);
final Reward reward = response.get(0);

// this will print "Ein großer Kaffee für dich!"
Log.d("dump server data", reward.getDescription());

final Reward reward2 = new Reward(reward.toJSON());

// this will print "Ein gro�er Kaffee f�r dich!"
Log.d("dump reloaded data", reward2.getDescription());

As you can see there is a problem with loading the data generated by JSONObject.toString().
Mainly whats happening is that JSONObject will parse escapes in the form of "\uXXXX" but it will dump them as plain UTF-8 text.

In turn, when parsing it won't properly read the unicode and instead insert a replacement character in the result string (� above \uffff as code point).

My current workaround consists of a look-up table containing the Unicode Latin1 supplement characters and their respective escaped versions (\u00a0 up to \u00ff). But this also means I have to go over each and every dumped JSON text and replace the characters with their escaped versions each time I dump something.

Please tell me there is a better way for this!

(Note: there is this question however he had problems with local file encoding on disk.
My problem above, as you can see, is reproducible without ever writing to disk)

EDIT: As requested in the comments here's the toJSON() method:

public final String toJSON() {
    JSONObject obj = new JSONObject();

    // mTitle and mDescription contain the unmodified
    // strings received from parsing.
    obj.put("title", mTitle);
    obj.put("description", mDescription);

    return obj.toString();
}

As a side note it makes no difference if I use JSONObject.toString() or a JSONStringer. (The documentation advises to use .toString())

EDIT: just to remove Reward from the equation, this reproduces the problem:

final JSONObject inputData = new JSONObject("{\"description\":\"Ein gro\\u00dfer Kaffee\"}");
final JSONObject parsedData = new JSONObject(inputData.toString());

Log.d("inputData", inputData.getString("description"));
Log.d("parsedData", parsedData.getString("description"));
share|improve this question
    
Show the toJSON() function –  Esailija Jan 11 '13 at 11:06
    
Btw your hunches are off, there is no UTF-8 in java strings, they are just strings. The internal encoding of Java strings is implementation detail that doesn't matter but that isn't UTF-8 either. I cannot explain this without there being some byte conversions happening. Maybe print reward.toJSON(). –  Esailija Jan 11 '13 at 12:21
    
Another possiblity is that the encoding Log.d uses to write a file is changed between the logs. But the conversion to JSON and from that JSON again should not cause this at all since it's dealing with pure strings at all times. –  Esailija Jan 11 '13 at 12:25
    
@Esailija I've added the function and yes, there's "only Strings" - but the statement that org.json.JSONObject will dump UTF-8 but won't re-parse it still holds. The Log.d above was just an example. Some is true if I would use two TextViews and assign response.getDescription() and response2.getDescription() to them. –  Shirkrin Jan 11 '13 at 12:46
    
If there is only strings, there is no UTF-8. But please print reward.toJSON(), if it looks correct, then you need to show the Reward constructor... pretty basic debugging and we should probably be in the chat.. –  Esailija Jan 11 '13 at 12:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

[Note: posted as an answer for better formatting]

I just tried the example

final JSONObject inputData = new JSONObject("{\"description\":\"Ein gro\\u00dfer Kaffee\"}");
final JSONObject parsedData = new JSONObject(inputData.toString());

Log.d("inputData", inputData.getString("description"));
Log.d("parsedData", parsedData.getString("description"));

on my Nexus 7 running Android 4.2.1, and on Nexus S running 4.1.2, and it works as intended:

D/inputData(17281): Ein großer Kaffee
D/parsedData(17281): Ein großer Kaffee

In which Android version did you see the problem?

share|improve this answer
2  
The inputData is wrong, it doesn't account for the fact that java compiler will already turn the \u00df to a character before the program is even run. So it should be tested with new JSONObject("{\"description\":\"Ein gro\\u00dfer Kaffee\"}"); –  Esailija Jan 11 '13 at 15:14
    
@Esailija good catch, but still the result is the same, it works. –  Henry Jan 11 '13 at 15:19
    
That's what I figured, see the discussion in the question comments. –  Esailija Jan 11 '13 at 15:19
    
I'm going to count this as a valid answer since after clearing the application's cache I'm also unable to reproduce it. Must have been some remains of old code which did some mashing up while passing the data around in Bundles. –  Shirkrin Jan 28 '13 at 7:27

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