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I am new with Ninject. Can someone help me to achieve what I want. I will give you my example. Please help me how you use NInject to get loose coupling.

Lets say I have an interface given below.

public interface IVehicle
{
 PrintSpecification();
}

Now I have three classes implementing above interface. They could be as shown.

public class Car implements IVehicle
{      
 public void PrintSpecification()
 { Console.WriteLine("Specification for Car");}
}

public class Bus implements IVehicle
{
  public void PrintSpecification()
  { Console.WriteLine("Specification for Bus");}
}

public class Truck implements IVehicle
{
  public void PrintSpecification()
  { Console.WriteLine("Specification for Truck");}
}

Now in my main program I will have something like this. Here I have used new operator to create three concrete implementations of Car, Bus and Truck. I have to display the specification of all three vehicles. Now I wonder how do I write my Ninject codes so that there is no dependency of the concrete classes.

Public static void main()
{
  IVehicle v1=new Car();
  IVehicle v2=new Bus();
  IVehicle v3=new Truck();
  v1.PrintSpecification();
  v2.PrintSpecification();
  v3.PrintSpecification();
}
share|improve this question
    
response is: it depends on how you would choose between the different implementation in your app... –  Felice Pollano Jan 11 '13 at 11:45

2 Answers 2

You can bind all specifications in this way:

public class AutoModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        Bind<IVehicle>().To<Car>();
        Bind<IVehicle>().To<Bus>();
        Bind<IVehicle>().To<Truck>();
    }
}

and in your app:

IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new AutoModule());

kernel.Bind<Inspector>().ToSelf();

class Inspector
{
      IVehicle[] vehicles;
      public Inspector(IVehicle[] vehicles)
      {
          this.vehicles=vehicles;
      }
      public void PrintSpecifications()
      {
           foreach(var v in vehicles )
           {
              v.PrintSpecification();
            }
      }
}

//automatic injection in constructor
kernel.Get<Inspector>().PrintSpecifications();

If you want some way to bind conditionately one implementation you can use

  • Named Bindings
  • Conditional Bindings
  • Contextual Bindings

There is a good documentation inthe NInject wiki.

If you need to map multiple tyes in your module, consider using some naming convention and create some automatic binding strategies.

You should also do some effort in being decoupled from the IoC container too, have a look on how the Composition Root Pattern works.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your reply. I have one last conceptual question though. With your solution, instead of creating concrete Car,Bus and Truck in my Main method, I created them in Load() method of the module. Now my question is How having these classes in Load() method made it Loosely coupled since I still have to specify concrete class names somewhere. –  user1592389 Jan 11 '13 at 12:09
    
The only thing I dont use this time is "new" operator. Don't this make AutoModule tightly coupled with concrete classes. –  user1592389 Jan 11 '13 at 12:11
    
@user1592389 the module is allowed to be thight coupled because it contains the types it want to expose. The important is your application being uncoupled with the module. I suggest you to decouple from the IoC too. –  Felice Pollano Jan 11 '13 at 13:32

Create module with named bindings for IVehicle implementations:

public class AutoModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        Bind<IVehicle>().To<Car>().Named("Small");
        Bind<IVehicle>().To<Bus>().Named("Big");
        Bind<IVehicle>().To<Truck>().Named("Huge");
    }
}

And get your vehicles by name:

IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new AutoModule());
IVehicle v1 = kernel.Get<IVehicle>("Small");
IVehicle v2 = kernel.Get<IVehicle>("Huge");
IVehicle v3 = kernel.Get<IVehicle>("Big");
v1.PrintSpecification();
v2.PrintSpecification();
v3.PrintSpecification();
share|improve this answer
    
Is it the right way of wiring the concrete methods or you just gave the alternative. Furthermore, if I have 50 other types of interfaces to be wired, should I do it in the same Load Method. –  user1592389 Jan 11 '13 at 11:42
    
@user1592389 yes, yous should bind all types you need for your application. Also if you need to bind one type to different implementations, you should use named binding. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 11 '13 at 11:55
1  
@lazyberezovsky Named binding is not the only way... it depends on what you want to achieve. –  Felice Pollano Jan 11 '13 at 11:59
    
@FelicePollano agree, but regarding to sample code I think its most appropriate one –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 11 '13 at 12:01

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