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I am confused about Ruby command-line options. Both -C dir and -X dir remove directory, but how do they differ from each other?

  • How does -x [dir] differ from -X dir?
  • What does -I dir do (I know that it adds dir as the directory for loading libraries)?
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So basically there are no difference between -C dir and -X dir. Am i correct? –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 11:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Let's create a test.rb file in home directory with following:

hello
#!/usr/bin/ruby
p "here"

Now if we try to run it:

ruby -C /home/my_home test.rb

Which means change working directory to /home/my_home and run test.rb you will get an error:

test.rb:1:in `<main>': undefined local variable or method `hello' for main:Object (NameError)

If we run it with:

ruby -x /home/my_home test.rb

We will get "here" printed and get no error. The main difference between -x and -C is that -x removes everything before the #!/usr/bin/ruby line. And you don't have to set directory to cd too, when using -x. Because the main purpose of -x is to remove lines and it just includes -C functionality too, if needed.

cd /home/my_home; ruby -x test.rb

See (ruby --help)

  • -Cdirectory cd to directory, before executing your script
  • -x[directory] strip off text before #!ruby line and perhaps cd to directory

As for -I. You can provide the directories that ruby will search for the file you execute or require.

ruby -x test.rb

Ruby will not find the test.rb file unless you are in /home/my_home. But if you add -I ruby will look for test.rb in "/home/my_home" too.

ruby -x -I/home/my_home test.rb

The difference with -C is that it will not change directory before executing, but will just search for files there.

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+1 to you for explanation! Thanks for your help and excellent explanations! Can i have up vote please? –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 10:09
    
Already. Sorry, I can't upvote you twice. :D –  Draco Ater Jan 11 '13 at 10:17
    
he he ! Okay SO is too clever to hide the WHO. I thought you didn't :-P –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 10:18
    
I can't see the answer of the Question How does -x [dir] differ from -X dir? . Can you help me where it is in your answer! :) rest all I have understood! –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 11:38
1  
-C is the same as -X (big X). –  Draco Ater Jan 11 '13 at 11:59

As you can see from man ruby or some docs online, -C and -X is the same.

And -I will add some dir to ruby LOAD_PATH. For example, I have ./a/my.rb and `./test.rb' like this:

# ./a/my.rb
def hello
  puts 'hello from a/my'
end

# ./test.rb
require 'my'
hello       

And I execute ruby -I ./a test.rb. This will print hello from a/my. Without -I, ruby will report an error: cannot load such file -- my, because ./a is not in current LOAD_PATH.

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+1 to you for explanation! Thanks for your help! –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 9:55
    
Can I have some up vote ? –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 9:55
    
@PythonLikeYOU You're welcome. –  halfelf Jan 11 '13 at 10:03
    
I can't see the answer of the Question How does -x [dir] differ from -X dir? . Can you help me where it is in your answer! :) rest all I have understood! –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 11:45

-C and -X options do the same job (Changes directory before executing). There is no difference.

-I option is used for adding path to $LOAD_PATH

For example: Assume you have ruby file called my_print_class.rb in my_lib directory my_print_class.rb:(~/my_lib/my_print_class.rb)

class MyPrintClass
   def self.my_print(str)
     puts str
   end
end

Now you have my_call.rb in home(~).

~/my_call.rb:

 require 'my_print_class'
 MyPrintClass.my_print("Hello world")

For this you need path of my_print_class so you use ruby -I my_lib my_call.rb

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/ruby/ruby_command_line_options.htm

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+1 to you for explanation! Thanks for your help! Can i have up vote please? –  Arup Rakshit Jan 11 '13 at 9:56

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