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does anyone know why this code doesn't work:

public class CollectionViewModel : ViewModelBase {  
    public ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel> ContentList
    {
        get { return _contentList; }
        set 
        { 
            _contentList = value; 
            RaisePropertyChanged("ContentList"); 
            //I want to be notified here when something changes..?
            //debugger doesn't stop here when IsRowChecked is toggled
        }
     }
}

public class EntityViewModel : ViewModelBase
{

    private bool _isRowChecked;

    public bool IsRowChecked
    {
        get { return _isRowChecked; }
        set { _isRowChecked = value; RaisePropertyChanged("IsRowChecked"); }
    }
}

PS: ViewModelBase containts everything for RaisePropertyChanged etc. and it's working for everything else except this problem..

share|improve this question
    
If MS creates "shallow" observable collection why not to make OnCollectionChanged Method public? It looks more reasonable and less headache –  sergtk Jul 28 '13 at 20:41

13 Answers 13

up vote 49 down vote accepted

The ContentList's Set method will not get called when you change a value inside the collection, instead you should be looking out for the CollectionChanged event firing.

public class CollectionViewModel : ViewModelBase
{          
    public ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel> ContentList
    {
        get { return _contentList; }
    }

    public CollectionViewModel()
    {
         _contentList = new ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel>();
         _contentList.CollectionChanged += ContentCollectionChanged;
    }

    public void ContentCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        //This will get called when the collection is changed
    }
}

EDIT

Okay, that's twice today I've been bitten by the MSDN documentation being wrong. In the link I gave you it says:

Occurs when an item is added, removed, changed, moved, or the entire list is refreshed.

But it actually doesn't fire when an item is changed. I guess you'll need a more bruteforce method then:

public class CollectionViewModel : ViewModelBase
{          
    public ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel> ContentList
    {
        get { return _contentList; }
    }

    public CollectionViewModel()
    {
         _contentList = new ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel>();
         _contentList.CollectionChanged += ContentCollectionChanged;
    }

    public void ContentCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove)
        {
            foreach(EntityViewModel item in e.OldItems)
            {
                //Removed items
                item.PropertyChanged -= EntityViewModelPropertyChanged;
            }
        }
        else if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add)
        {
            foreach(EntityViewModel item in e.NewItems)
            {
                //Added items
                item.PropertyChanged += EntityViewModelPropertyChanged;
            }     
        }       
    }

    public void EntityViewModelPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        //This will get called when the property of an object inside the collection changes
    }
}

If you are going to need this a lot you may want to subclass your own ObservableCollection that triggers the CollectionChanged event when a member triggers its PropertyChanged event automatically (like it says it should in the documentation...)

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1  
I was looking for this for so long! Thanks a lot! –  Joseph jun. Melettukunnel Sep 15 '09 at 14:28
9  
note that if you don't want to implement the event management yourself, you can use a BindingList<EntityViewModel> in place of ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel>. It will then automatically forward EntityViewModel.PropertyChanged events as ListChanged events where ListChangedType == ItemChanged. –  mjeanes Sep 15 '09 at 15:35
8  
Doesn't this all depend on your understanding of the term changed? This could mean that a property of one of the elements in the collection has changed (which is how I think you are interpreting it) or it could mean that one of the elements of the collection has been changed by replacing it with a different instance (this is my interpretation). Not totally convinced though - will have to look into it further. –  belugabob Jul 6 '11 at 11:45
5  
What happen if I invoke _contentList.Clear()? No one will unsubscribe from PropertyChanged! –  Paolo Moretti Aug 3 '12 at 11:00
2  
@Paolo: That's right, ContentCollectionChanged only handles Add/Remove, and not Replace/Reset. I'll try to edit and fix the post. The way simon does it in his answer is correct. –  adabyron Mar 11 '13 at 12:55

Here is a drop-in class that sub-classes ObservableCollection and actually raises a Reset action when a property on a list item changes. It enforces all items to implement INotifyPropertyChanged.

The benefit here is that you can data bind to this class and all of your bindings will update with changes to your item properties.

public class TrulyObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>
where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public TrulyObservableCollection()
        : base()
    {
        CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged);
    }

    void TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.NewItems != null)
        {
            foreach (Object item in e.NewItems)
            {
                (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
            }
        }
        if (e.OldItems != null)
        {
            foreach (Object item in e.OldItems)
            {
                (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged -= new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
            }
        }
    }

    void item_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs a = new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset);
        OnCollectionChanged(a);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the perfectly elegant solution, Simon - I'd bounty you if I could :) –  DefenestrationDay Jul 19 '11 at 22:52
    
might be worth short circuiting if e.Action == move? –  jk. Jul 29 '11 at 15:56
    
love it, nicely done. –  Shahzad Sep 26 '12 at 3:09
1  
I've had cause to implement something similar myself, however rather than use NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset I instead used .Replace: new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Replace, item, item, IndexOf(item)). –  Chris Apr 29 '13 at 15:34
1  
Awesome solution to my problem - thank you! For those who created their ObservableCollection with a List, you may want to add a constructor that also itterates though all the items and adds PropertyChanged. –  Gavin Jun 23 '13 at 8:41

This uses the above ideas but makes it a derived 'more sensitive' collection:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Collections.Specialized;
using System.Collections;

namespace somethingelse
{
    public class ObservableCollectionEx<T> : ObservableCollection<T> where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        // this collection also reacts to changes in its components' properties

        public ObservableCollectionEx() : base()
        {
            this.CollectionChanged +=new System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(ObservableCollectionEx_CollectionChanged);
        }

        void ObservableCollectionEx_CollectionChanged(object sender, System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove)
            {
                foreach(T item in e.NewItems)
                {
                    //Removed items
                    item.PropertyChanged -= EntityViewModelPropertyChanged;
                }
            }
            else if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add)
            {
                foreach(T item in e.NewItems)
                {
                    //Added items
                    item.PropertyChanged += EntityViewModelPropertyChanged;
                }     
            }       
        }

        public void EntityViewModelPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            //This will get called when the property of an object inside the collection changes - note you must make it a 'reset' - dunno why
            NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs args = new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset);
            OnCollectionChanged(args);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the example. You need to change: e.NewItems to: e.OldItems when removing items. NewItems is null when removing –  mdiehl13 Nov 30 '13 at 20:30

ObservableCollection will not propagate individual item changes as CollectionChanged events. You will either need to subscribe to each event and forward it manually, or you can check out the BindingList[T] class, which will do this for you.

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I used Jack Kenyons answer to implement my own OC, but I'd like to point out one change i had to make to make it work. Instead of:

    if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove)
    {
        foreach(T item in e.NewItems)
        {
            //Removed items
            item.PropertyChanged -= EntityViewModelPropertyChanged;
        }
    }

I used this:

    if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove)
    {
        foreach(T item in e.OldItems)
        {
            //Removed items
            item.PropertyChanged -= EntityViewModelPropertyChanged;
        }
    }

It seems that the "e.NewItems" produces null if action is .Remove.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it needs further changes as well what if e.Action == replace –  jk. Jul 29 '11 at 15:53

There is a good article (samples in VB) on ObservableCollections in the msdn magazine Advanced Basics - The ObservableCollection Class that explains the problem in more detail.

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Added to TruelyObservableCollection event "ItemPropertyChanged":

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel; // ObservableCollection
using System.ComponentModel; // INotifyPropertyChanged
using System.Collections.Specialized; // NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ObservableCollectionTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // ATTN: Please note it's a "TrulyObservableCollection" that's instantiated. Otherwise, "Trades[0].Qty = 999" will NOT trigger event handler "Trades_CollectionChanged" in main.
            // REF: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8490533/notify-observablecollection-when-item-changes
            TrulyObservableCollection<Trade> Trades = new TrulyObservableCollection<Trade>();
            Trades.Add(new Trade { Symbol = "APPL", Qty = 123 });
            Trades.Add(new Trade { Symbol = "IBM", Qty = 456});
            Trades.Add(new Trade { Symbol = "CSCO", Qty = 789 });

            Trades.CollectionChanged += Trades_CollectionChanged;
            Trades.ItemPropertyChanged += PropertyChangedHandler;
            Trades.RemoveAt(2);

            Trades[0].Qty = 999;

            Console.WriteLine("Hit any key to exit");
            Console.ReadLine();

            return;
        }

        static void PropertyChangedHandler(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString() + ", Property changed: " + e.PropertyName + ", Symbol: " + ((Trade) sender).Symbol + ", Qty: " + ((Trade) sender).Qty);
            return;
        }

        static void Trades_CollectionChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString() + ", Collection changed");
            return;
        }
    }

    #region TrulyObservableCollection
    public class TrulyObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>
        where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler ItemPropertyChanged;

        public TrulyObservableCollection()
            : base()
        {
            CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged);
        }

        void TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.NewItems != null)
            {
                foreach (Object item in e.NewItems)
                {
                    (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
                }
            }
            if (e.OldItems != null)
            {
                foreach (Object item in e.OldItems)
                {
                    (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged -= new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
                }
            }
        }

        void item_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs a = new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset);
            OnCollectionChanged(a);

            if (ItemPropertyChanged != null)
            {
                ItemPropertyChanged(sender, e);
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Sample entity
    class Trade : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        protected string _Symbol;
        protected int _Qty = 0;
        protected DateTime _OrderPlaced = DateTime.Now;

        public DateTime OrderPlaced
        {
            get { return _OrderPlaced; }
        }

        public string Symbol
        {
            get
            {
                return _Symbol;
            }
            set
            {
                _Symbol = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("Symbol");
            }
        }

        public int Qty
        {
            get
            {
                return _Qty;
            }
            set
            {
                _Qty = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("Qty");
            }
        }

        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String propertyName = "")
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }
        }
    }
#endregion
}
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I know that I'm too late for this party, but maybe - it will help to someone..

Here you can find my implementation of ObservableCollectionEx. It has some features:

  • it supports everything from ObservableCollection
  • it's thread safe
  • it supports ItemPropertyChanged event (it raises each time when Item.PropertyChanged item is fired)
  • it supports filters (so, you could create ObservableCollectionEx, pass another collection as Source to it, and Filter with simple predicate. Very useful in WPF, I use this feature a lot in my applications). Even more - filter tracks changes of items via INotifyPropertyChanged interface.

Of course, any comments are appreciated ;)

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Большое спасибо! Many thanks for sharing that! You saved me numerous hours by not having to write my own implementation! :) –  Alexander Jul 7 '13 at 6:23
    
@Alexander you're very wellcome :) –  chopikadze Jul 7 '13 at 12:02

Just adding my 2 cents on this topic. Felt the TrulyObservableCollection required the two other constructors as found with ObservableCollection:

public TrulyObservableCollection()
        : base()
    {
        HookupCollectionChangedEvent();
    }

    public TrulyObservableCollection(IEnumerable<T> collection)
        : base(collection)
    {
        foreach (T item in collection)
            item.PropertyChanged += ItemPropertyChanged;

        HookupCollectionChangedEvent();
    }

    public TrulyObservableCollection(List<T> list)
        : base(list)
    {
        list.ForEach(item => item.PropertyChanged += ItemPropertyChanged);

        HookupCollectionChangedEvent();
    }

    private void HookupCollectionChangedEvent()
    {
        CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(TrulyObservableCollectionChanged);
    }
share|improve this answer

Simple solution for standard observablecollection that I've used:

DO NOT ADD to your property OR CHANGE it's inner items DIRECTLY, instead, create some temp collection like this

ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel> tmpList= new ObservableCollection<EntityViewModel>();

and add items or make changes to tmpList,

tmpList.Add(new EntityViewModel(){IsRowChecked=false}); //Example
tmpList[0].IsRowChecked= true; //Example
...

then pass it to your actual property by assignment.

ContentList=tmpList;

this will change whole property which causes notice the INotifyPropertyChanged as you need.

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I try this solution, but only works for me like a RaisePropertyChange("SourceGroupeGridView") when collection changed, that fired for each item add or changed.

The problem is in:

public void EntityViewModelPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e) { NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs args = new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset); OnCollectionChanged(args); }

NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset this action make a complete rebind of all items in groupedgrid, is equivalent at RaisePropertyChanged. When you use it all groups of gridview refreshed.

IF you, only want to refresh in UI the group of the new item, you don't use Reset action, you will need simulate a Add action in itemproperty with something like this:

 void item_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {

            var index = this.IndexOf((T)sender);

            this.RemoveAt(index);
            this.Insert(index, (T)sender);

            var a = new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add, sender);
            OnCollectionChanged(a);


    }

Sorry by my english, and thanks for the base code :), I hope this helps someone ^_^

Enjoi!!

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Here's an extension method for the above solution...

    public static TrulyObservableCollection<T> ToTrulyObservableCollection<T>(this List<T> list)
         where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        var newList = new TrulyObservableCollection<T>();

        if (list != null)
        {
            list.ForEach(o => newList.Add(o));
        }

        return newList;
    }  
share|improve this answer

No this will never work because collection does not refresh or fires any event at all if one of the item of collection fires any event you will have to pass a reference of your collection inside your item in order to fire any event.

You will have to choose some different approach.

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