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Why is this not possible?

abstract class A
{
    public abstract T f<T>();
}

class B<T> : A
{
    public override T f()
    {
        return default (T);
    }
}

Errors:

does not implement inherited abstract member 'A.f<T>()'
no suitable method found to override

I know that the signature must be same, but from my point of view I see no reason what could possibly be wrong that this is forbidden. Also I know that another solution is to make A generic, rather than its method, but it is not suitable for me for some reason.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

B does not fulfil the contract of A.

A allows f to be called with any type parameter to return that type. B doesn't allow f to be called with a type parameter, and just returns the type of B's type parameter.

For example, say you had a B<int> and cast it to an A (which should be possible as it inherits from it). Then you called f<bool>() on it (which should be possible as it's an A). What then? The underlying B<int> doesn't have a method to call.

B b = new B<int>();
// This is legal as B inherits from A
A a = b;
// This is a legal call, but how does b handle it?
bool result = a.f<bool>();
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>B only allows f to be called with B's type parameter B does not have a generic method f at all so B doesn't even allow f to be called with B's type paramter –  Rune FS Jan 11 '13 at 9:18
    
@RuneFS I didn't mean that literally; I'll make it clearer. –  Rawling Jan 11 '13 at 9:21
    
Great answer... I think this explains the reason in the best way. –  Zoka Jan 11 '13 at 9:28

This is not possible because those methods have different signatures. A.f is generic method and B.f is not (it merely uses class generic argument).

You can see this form caller perspective:

A variableA = new A();
variableA.f<int>();

B<int> variableB = new B<int>();
variableB.f();
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I know signature is different. But isn't it same if I specify the generic parameter when creating instead of during invoking the method? I see it this way: T A.f() == T B.f() - both methods takes same parameters, and returns same type, so what problem do I miss? –  Zoka Jan 11 '13 at 9:13
    
No it is not. You can easily declare generic class that contains generic method. You are disputing how C# is designed you have two choices accept it or change language. –  Rafal Jan 11 '13 at 9:16

In the case of your code

abstract class A
{
    public abstract T f<T>();
}

class B<T> : A
{
    public override T f()
    {
        return default (T);
    }
}

what do you expect to be called in the below code

public void Foo(A myObj) {
    myObj.f<DateTime>();
}
Foo(new B<int>());

There's no implementation for that method though the type contract (the abstract class A) clearly states that you need an implementation. So you can either implement or change the contract to use a type argument at the class level

abstract class A<T>
{
    public abstract T f();
}

class B<T> : A<T>
{
    public override T f()
    {
        return default (T);
    }
}

does compile however it also limits f of course

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My idea is A myObj = new B<int>(); myObj.f(); Note missing DateTime from calling f. I want to say during creation, this class uses T as generic parameters for all its functions. –  Zoka Jan 11 '13 at 9:20
1  
@Zoka you're right "for all its functions". But f<T> is the function of the base class and derived class type parameter has no power over it. It's base class method's type parameter - method level, not class. –  horgh Jan 11 '13 at 9:24
    
Now... last example of Rune FS here: I can name generic parameter same name for class and overrides and it really compiles, with warning - but what does it do? My guess is it just hide the class parameter from using inside the overriden method, right? –  Zoka Jan 11 '13 at 9:27
1  
@Zoka it's the same, as if you had different names, i.e. you still may specify any type parameter while calling f<anything>(); and it'll use the specified by the call one, not the class type parameter. –  horgh Jan 11 '13 at 9:32
    
@Konstantin: I thought so. –  Zoka Jan 11 '13 at 9:33

Probably this is what you intend to do:

abstract class A
{
    public abstract T f<T>();
}

class B<U> : A
{
    public override T f<T>() //also needs to have a generic type parameter
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public U f()
    {
        return f<U>();
    }
}

The generic method type parameter and the generic class type parameter (here T and U) have no straightforward connection, i.e. T is not restricted to be U (or something) in the base class and you cannot change this restriction in the derived class.

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abstract class A
{
    public abstract T f<T>();
}

class B<T> : A
{
    public override T f<T>()
    {
        return default (T);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know the solution, I want to know WHY? –  Zoka Jan 11 '13 at 9:23
    
this is one right way, it's quastion same as "i can't override method public abstract void Func() as public override bool Func(int digit) why?" signature is not match –  burning_LEGION Jan 11 '13 at 9:31

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