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I wrote a function to remove odd number from a list, like that:

def remove_odd(l):
    for i in l:
        if i % 2 != 0:
            l.remove(i)
    print l
    return l

remove_odd([4,5,4])
remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11])
remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11,12,13])

It returns:

[4, 4]
[4, 4, 9]
[4, 4, 9, 12]

-> wrong

but when I change to remove even number:

def remove_even(l):
    for i in l:
        if i % 2 == 0:
            l.remove(i)
    print l
    return l

remove_even([4,5,4])
remove_even([4,5,4,7,9,11])
remove_even([4,5,4,7,9,11,12,13])

The answer is OK:

[5]
[5, 7, 9, 11]
[5, 7, 9, 11, 13]

What is wrong with the remove_odd() func? I know people usually create the second list inside the func then append even number to that list, but can we solve this exercise with list.remove() ?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
5  
Don't remove items from a list while iterating over it. That's like changing the wheels of your car while driving –  Andreas Jung Jan 11 '13 at 9:30
1  
If you really have to, iterate over its indices from highest to lowest. But prefer to use built-in filter or similar. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 11 '13 at 9:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your function is working in another way than you would expect. The for loop takes first element, than second etc., so when you remove one element, others change their positions and can be skipped by it (and that happens in your case) when they are preceded by another odd number.

If you insist on using .remove() method, you must operate on a copy instead, like this:

def remove_odd(1):
    for i in l[:]:
        if i % 2 != 0:
            l.remove(i)
    return l

(l[:] is a shallow copy of list l)

However, I think using list comprehension would be much clearer:

def remove_odd(l):
    return [x for x in l if x % 2 == 0]
share|improve this answer
1  
Although this is obviously the preferred way to do the job in python, it looks to me that the poster is already aware of how to solve the problem by creating a new list. Their question is specifically how to achieve the same using remove. –  georg Jan 11 '13 at 9:51
    
Yes, I have concentrated on what's wrong with my function question and missed the second part. Thank you, I'll extend my answer now. –  Althorion Jan 11 '13 at 11:23
    
Now it's perfect! Take my +1. –  georg Jan 11 '13 at 11:28
    
Thanks all you guys. Now I understand :) –  neo0 Jan 12 '13 at 14:01
    
Hi, one quick question : Why did you do that ` for i in l[:]:` instead of only for i in l:? –  Andy K Oct 14 '14 at 14:27

Python has a built-in method for this: filter

filtered_list = filter(lambda x: x%2==0, input_list)

Be careful in Python 3, as here filter is only a generator, so you have to write:

filtered_list = list(filter(lambda x: x%2==0, input_list))
share|improve this answer

What is wrong with the remove_odd() func?

You are iterating over a list while changing its size. This is causing it to skip one or more elements

Why don't you use list comprehension. Its more Pythonic, and readable

def remove_odd(l):
    return [e for e in l if e % 2 == 0]

remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11])
[4, 4]

Similarly you can write your remove_even routine

def remove_even(l):
    return [e for e in l if e % 2]

remove_even([4,5,4,7,9,11])
[5, 7, 9, 11]
share|improve this answer

You are trying to modify a list while you're iterating over it.

Try something like this:

In [28]: def remove_odd(l):
    return [x for x in l if x%2 == 0]
   ....: 

In [29]: remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11])
Out[29]: [4, 4]

In [30]: remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11,12,13])
Out[30]: [4, 4, 12]

or to fix your your code only, you should iterate over l[:].

l[:] returns a shallow copy of l which is equivalent to list(l).

In [38]: def remove_odd(l):
        for i in l[:]:
                if i % 2 != 0:
                      l.remove(i)
        return l
   ....:     

In [39]: remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11,12,13])
Out[39]: [4, 4, 12]

In [40]: remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11])
Out[40]: [4, 4]
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah. Great to know about shallow copy of a list. Thanks! :) –  neo0 Jan 12 '13 at 14:03

the best way to modify entire list is using it's copy:

>>> range(10)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> l=range(10)
>>> type(l)
<type 'list'>
>>> l[:]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> type(l[:])
<type 'list'>
>>>

From off docs:

If you need to modify the sequence you are iterating over while inside the loop (for example to duplicate selected items), it is recommended that you first make a copy. Iterating over a sequence does not implicitly make a copy. The slice notation makes this especially convenient:

   >>>>>> for w in words[:]:  # Loop over a slice copy of the entire list.
    ...     if len(w) > 6:
    ...         words.insert(0, w)
    ...
    >>> words
    ['defenestrate', 'cat', 'window', 'defenestrate']

http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/controlflow.html

And specifically for your example:

def remove_odd(l):
    for i in l[:]:
        if i % 2:
            l.remove(i)
    return l

works just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
This answers the question exactly as asked. –  georg Jan 11 '13 at 9:44

You can understand what's happening if you use enumerate in your example.

def remove_odd(l):
    for n, i in enumerate(l):
        print n, i
        if i % 2 != 0:
            l.remove(i)
    print l
    return l

remove_odd([4,5,4,7,9,11])

It gives the result:

0 4
1 5
2 7
3 11
[4, 4, 9]

So in the first and second case the for loop uses the right values 4 and 5. But you remove the 5 from l. Then in the third step you call 7 instead of the 4 on third position. Therefore it's best to copy l, as already suggested by other answers.

share|improve this answer
    
Woah thanks for your suggestion. enumerate() is great function. Check it! –  neo0 Jan 12 '13 at 14:06

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