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I play with a Java benchmark (SPECJbb) but observed some performance degradation with large pages (2M per page) enabled. Our server is NUMA arch based, has 80 cores (160 logical cpu when HT enabled) and 260G memory.

The benchmark consumes about 200G memory, so I allocated 200G large in kernel large page pool.But the performance is 6%~8% decline. I think I should have some performance gain because this benchmark used 200G memory.

My question is about, in what situation, using large page will degrade performace? Our OS is RHEL6.3 and I tried HotSpot JDK 1.6.38 and 1.6.37, both these two versions I found such degradation. Thanks.

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Large pages should usually bring up to 5% performance improvement.

You should check whether the large pages were properly allocated:

  • see cat /proc/meminfo and check for actual large pages allocation size
  • How big is your Heap? Did you use the -XX:+UseLargePages option? See that the JVM managed to use large pages, there will be a warning in the JVM output log if there was any problem

Also, there could be a problem with LargePages + NUMA architecture. How much memory there is for each core? See:

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Thanks for your answer! I also checked this page linux-hacks.blogspot.com/2009/06/using-large-pages.html. The author said that "After some debugging, the issue turned out to be that the application was not able to utilize the large pages allocated (thanks to some weird environment I had ;-) ).". It seems that I have the same symptom with him, but he didn't describle the real reason in the blog. –  Sili Jan 14 '13 at 3:04
    
Yes, thats the link I was referring to. Does your JVM manages to start with the huge pages you give it? What are your JVM options? And, are there any error messages? HugePages_Free number should decrease by the size of your heap. –  Ales Plsek Jan 14 '13 at 4:34
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Hi, I fixed this problem by running my benchmark using root. It seems that JVM uses SYS5 style api to allocate huge pages pool, which require root permission. –  Sili Jan 15 '13 at 3:04
    
Nice! Good to know that it works for your OS at least for the root. Now you should be able to figure out howto run under other users - because I know that it should work as well. –  Ales Plsek Jan 15 '13 at 17:31

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