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I have a large file which contains tables of different tab separated data. The different tables are separated by a blank line.

I have the line number of the start of a particular table and I need to retrieve the whole table.

How can I use grep (or something similar) to get the line number of the next blank line after a specific line number?

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you want to retrieve the table or just the next blank line nr?? –  Kent Jan 11 '13 at 10:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use sed for this, this should do the trick:

sed -n '1,/^\s*$/p' file

Just replace the first number before the comma, in this case 1 with the line number, demo to print each table from a given line number:

$ cat file
one
two
three

five
six
seven

nine
ten
eleven

$ sed -n '1,/^\s*$/p' file
one
two
three

$ sed -n '5,/^\s*$/p' file
five
six
seven

$ sed -n '9,/^\s*$/p' file
nine
ten
eleven

Using the -n option to turn of default printing of every line and the p flag sed prints from the line number to the first line that matches the regexp where:

^     # Matches the start of the line
\s*   # Matches zero or more whitespace characters
$     # Matches the end of the line

Using the format sed -n 'A,Bp' where A and B can be either lines numbers or regular expression you can print subsections of files easily.

To print just the line number of the next blank line with sed do:

$ sed -n '1,/^\s*$/{=}' file | tail -1
4

$ sed -n '5,/^\s*$/{=}' file | tail -1
8

$ sed -n '9,/^\s*$/{=}' file | tail -1
12

Or just printing where all the blanks lines are

$ sed -n '/^\s*$/{=}' file
4
8
12

Getting the next blank line number with awk doesn't require using tail:

$ awk 'NR>=1 && /^\s*$/{print NR;exit}' file
4

$ awk 'NR>=5 && /^\s*$/{print NR;exit}' file
8

$ awk 'NR>=9 && /^\s*$/{print NR;exit}' file
12

$ awk '/^\s*$/{print NR}' file
4
8
12

If it makes it clearer for you, you can pass a variable in with awk using -v

$ awk -v start=1 'NR>=start && /^\s*$/{print NR;exit}' file
4

$ awk -v start=5 'NR>=start && /^\s*$/{print NR;exit}' file
8

$ awk -v start=9 'NR>=start && /^\s*$/{print NR;exit}' file
12
share|improve this answer
    
So where would the start line go? –  Jacob Tomlinson Jan 11 '13 at 10:07
    
@JacobTomlinson I have updated my answer, it should contain everything you need. –  iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 10:35
    
nice answer with explanations. just one comment, he mentioned "large file" personally I feel it would be better with sed -n '5,$p; /^\s*$/q' of course, if it make sense depending on how large his file is. but you could test with seq 99999999999|sed ... –  Kent Jan 11 '13 at 10:45
    
@Kent Did you test? That won't work I think you mean sed -n '5,${p;/^\s*$/q}', I understand what you saying but very much doubt any time will be saved with the method you tried. –  iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 10:49
    
Large file was probably a bit of an overstatement. It is around 4000 lines. But thank you for your answer it solved my problem quite elegantly. –  Jacob Tomlinson Jan 11 '13 at 11:01

Perl makes this simple. To extract all the lines from line 31 to the next blank line in some_file:

$ perl -wne 'print if 31 .. /^$/' some_file
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one way with awk:

awk -vs=$sta '{ok=NR>=s}ok&&!$0{exit;}ok&&$0'

$sta is a variable, which stores the start line number. if we test with sudo_O 's input example with start line nr=5, it looks like:

kent$  sta=5

kent$  echo "1
2
3

5
6
7

9
10
11"|awk -vs=$sta '{ok=NR>=s}ok&&!$0{exit;}ok&&$0'
5
6
7

note that sed's address will include the boundary ,which means, the empty line after the target table will also be printed out. This awk one-liner won't print it. well it depends on what you want in output.

EDIT in case you just want to get the next empty line number

awk -vs=$sta 'NR>=s&&!$0{print NR;exit;}' file
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Here in the below command 5 is your known line number of the table

perl -lne 'exit if(/^$/ && $.>5);if($.>=5){print}' your_file
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