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I'm looking to sort an array of about 200-300 objects, sorting on a specific key and a given order (asc/desc). The order of results must be consistent and stable.

What would be the best algorithm to use, and could you provide an example of it's implementation in javascript?

Thanks!

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2  
Since at least Chrome's array sort doesn't seem to be stable, relying on the built-in array sort is not an option for you. –  Nosredna Sep 15 '09 at 14:56
    
To summarize: I went with a hand rolled merge sort due to Array.sort stability inconsistencies between modern browsers (mainly chrome not implementing a stable sort at the time of this comment). Thanks everyone for your help! –  William Casarin Sep 15 '09 at 15:30
    
What do we mean by "stable" sort? –  mowwwalker Dec 24 '13 at 23:46
    
@mowwwalker Stable sort is a sort in which all of the items with the same sorting value are left in the same order as in the original collection. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorting_algorithm#Stability –  Kornelije Petak Feb 27 at 23:47
    
To answer "what is the best algorithm to use" we need to know if there is any underlying structure to your data. A lot of the answers below just talk about using merge sort, or quick sort, in reality it depends on the data. It's not a simple problem to just answer i wouldn't say. Google a few sorting algorithms and read about them to see what i mean. TimSort and Radix Sort are two good examples i'd reccomend reading about. –  will Jun 25 at 0:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 33 down vote accepted

It is possible to get a stable sorting from a non-stable sort function.

Before sorting you get the position of all the elements. In your sort condition, if both elements are equal, then you sort by the position.

Tada! You've got a stable sort.

I've written an article about it on my blog if you want to know more about this technique and how to implement it: http://blog.vjeux.com/2010/javascript/javascript-sorting-table.html

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Since you are looking for something stable, the merge sort should do.

http://en.literateprograms.org/Merge_sort_(JavaScript)

EDIT:

According to this post, it looks like Array.Sort in some implementations uses a merge sort.

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++ Merge sort is my favorite. It's simple and stable with no bad worst cases. –  Mike Dunlavey Sep 15 '09 at 15:05
    
I'll look into this. Thanks! –  William Casarin Sep 15 '09 at 15:09

I know that this question has been answered for some time, but I happen to have a good stable merge sort implementation for Array and jQuery in my clipboard, so I'll share it in the hopes that some future searchers might find it useful.

It allows you to specify your own comparison function just like the normal Array.sort implementation.

Implementation

// Add stable merge sort to Array and jQuery prototypes
// Note: We wrap it in a closure so it doesn't pollute the global
//       namespace, but we don't put it in $(document).ready, since it's
//       not dependent on the DOM
(function() {

  // expose to Array and jQuery
  Array.prototype.mergeSort = jQuery.fn.mergeSort = mergeSort;

  function mergeSort(compare) {

    var length = this.length,
        middle = Math.floor(length / 2);

    if (!compare) {
      compare = function(left, right) {
        if (left < right)
          return -1;
        if (left == right)
          return 0;
        else
          return 1;
      };
    }

    if (length < 2)
      return this;

    return merge(
      this.slice(0, middle).mergeSort(compare),
      this.slice(middle, length).mergeSort(compare),
      compare
    );
  }

  function merge(left, right, compare) {

    var result = [];

    while (left.length > 0 || right.length > 0) {
      if (left.length > 0 && right.length > 0) {
        if (compare(left[0], right[0]) <= 0) {
          result.push(left[0]);
          left = left.slice(1);
        }
        else {
          result.push(right[0]);
          right = right.slice(1);
        }
      }
      else if (left.length > 0) {
        result.push(left[0]);
        left = left.slice(1);
      }
      else if (right.length > 0) {
        result.push(right[0]);
        right = right.slice(1);
      }
    }
    return result;
  }
})();

Example Usage

var sorted = [
  'Finger',
  'Sandwich',
  'sandwich',
  '5 pork rinds',
  'a guy named Steve',
  'some noodles',
  'mops and brooms',
  'Potato Chip Brand® chips'
].mergeSort(function(left, right) {
  lval = left.toLowerCase();
  rval = right.toLowerCase();

  console.log(lval, rval);
  if (lval < rval)
    return -1;
  else if (lval == rval)
    return 0;
  else
    return 1;
});

sorted == ["5 pork rinds", "a guy named Steve", "Finger", "mops and brooms", "Potato Chip Brand® chips", "Sandwich", "sandwich", "some noodles"];
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1  
Note this is at odds with the native sort, which works in place, meaning this cannot just be dropped in. –  Eric Feb 28 at 21:31
2  
Maybe stable, but this method is about 20 times slower than native array.sort, see test here for both strings and integers -> jsfiddle.net/QC64j –  davidkonrad Mar 4 at 15:05
    
Of course it's slower than native sort—it's not native. That's impossible. It's also true that it doesn't do an in place sort. That's also impossible (best case you create a copy then overwrite the original). Besides, returning a sorted copy is more JavaScript-y despite JavaScript's own native sort behavior. The function is also called mergeSort and not sort, so it's not intended as a drop in replacement. Sometimes you just need a stable merge sort, e.g. when sorting tables by column. –  sidewaysmilk Mar 4 at 18:40

Here's a stable implementation. It works by using the native sort, but in cases where elements compare as equal, you break ties using the original index position.

function stableSort(arr, cmpFunc) {
    //wrap the arr elements in wrapper objects, so we can associate them with their origional starting index position
    var arrOfWrapper = arr.map(function(elem, idx){
        return {elem: elem, idx: idx};
    });

    //sort the wrappers, breaking sorting ties by using their elements orig index position
    arrOfWrapper.sort(function(wrapperA, wrapperB){
        var cmpDiff = cmpFunc(wrapperA.elem, wrapperB.elem);
        return cmpDiff === 0 
             ? wrapperA.idx - wrapperB.idx
             : cmpDiff;
    });

    //unwrap and return the elements
    return arrOfWrapper.map(function(wrapper){
        return wrapper.elem;
    });
}

a non-thorough test

var res = stableSort([{a:1, b:4}, {a:1, b:5}], function(a, b){
    return a.a - b.a;
});
console.log(res);

another answer alluded to this, but didn't post teh codez.

but, its not fast according to my benchmark. I modified a merge sort impl to accept a custom comparator function, and it was much faster.

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Counting Sort is faster than merge sort (it performs in O(n) time) and it is intended for use on integers.

Math.counting_sort = function (m) {
    var i
    var j
    var k
    var step
    var start
    var Output
    var hash
    k = m.length
    Output = new Array ()
    hash = new Array ()
    // start at lowest possible value of m
    start = 0
    step = 1
    // hash all values
    i = 0
    while ( i < k ) {
        var _m = m[i]
        hash [_m] = _m
        i = i + 1
    }
    i = 0
    j = start
    // find all elements within x
    while ( i < k ) {
        while ( j != hash[j] ) {
            j = j + step
        }
        Output [i] = j
        i = i + 1
        j = j + step
    }
    return Output
}

Example:

var uArray = new Array ()<br/>
var sArray = new Array ()<br/><br/>
uArray = [ 10,1,9,2,8,3,7,4,6,5 ]<br/>
sArray = Math.counting_sort ( uArray ) // returns a sorted array
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3  
A few things to be said: 1. Counting sort only works well in a dense number space. (Try sorting the array [1, 2e9, 1e9]) 2. Don't write for loops as while loops. 3. Don't randomly add things to the Math namespace. 4. You might want to consider making friends with semicolons. –  Domi Jan 7 at 9:00

A simple one mergeSort from http://www.stoimen.com/blog/2010/07/02/friday-algorithms-javascript-merge-sort/

var a = [34, 203, 3, 746, 200, 984, 198, 764, 9];

function mergeSort(arr)
{
    if (arr.length < 2)
         return arr;

    var middle = parseInt(arr.length / 2);
    var left   = arr.slice(0, middle);
    var right  = arr.slice(middle, arr.length);

    return merge(mergeSort(left), mergeSort(right));
}

function merge(left, right)
{
     var result = [];

    while (left.length && right.length) {
         if (left[0] <= right[0]) {
             result.push(left.shift());
         } else {
            result.push(right.shift());
         }
    }

    while (left.length)
        result.push(left.shift());

    while (right.length)
        result.push(right.shift());

    return result;
}

console.log(mergeSort(a));
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I have to sort multidimensional arrays by an arbitrary column, and then by another. I use this function to sort:

function sortMDArrayByColumn(ary, sortColumn){

    //Adds a sequential number to each row of the array
    //This is the part that adds stability to the sort
    for(var x=0; x<ary.length; x++){ary[x].index = x;}

    ary.sort(function(a,b){
        if(a[sortColumn]>b[sortColumn]){return 1;}
        if(a[sortColumn]<b[sortColumn]){return -1;}
        if(a.index>b.index){
            return 1;
        }
        return -1;
    });
}

Notice that ary.sort never returns zero, which is where some implementations of the "sort" function make decisions that might not be right.

This is pretty darn fast, too.

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Will the built in sort function do? http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref%5Fsort.asp

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2  
I don't think the built-in sort uses a stable algorithm –  Philippe Leybaert Sep 15 '09 at 14:45
    
I was thinking the same thing. –  Kevin Sep 15 '09 at 14:46
    
Oh, bummer. I second the suggested merge sort then :) –  finalman Sep 15 '09 at 14:48
1  
Good point. It's not guaranteed, but browsers have moved toward using stable implementations. IE 6+ is stable. Firefox 3 is. Safari is. Not sure about Chrome (I'd hope it is). Or Opera (it used to be unstable--I hope it's fixed now). –  Nosredna Sep 15 '09 at 14:50
    
Chrome not stable. Does anyone know if Opera 10 is? –  Nosredna Sep 15 '09 at 14:57

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