Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically, I want to reset (undo) a Twitter Bootstrap 2.2 reset for img that originates from the reset.less file.

Twitter Bootstrap is essentially setting this css:

img {
  width: auto\9;
  height: auto;
}

What CSS can I add after this to undo this? I'm actually using the bootstrap-sass gem, so that's what I need to deal with.

If I comment out the CSS in the gem source, my issue is resolved, but that doesn't help me when the gem is loaded by heroku. So I need a local override/monkey patch to fix this.

Thanks. Here is the issue: https://github.com/desandro/isotope/issues/335#issuecomment-11507013 and here: https://github.com/twitter/bootstrap/issues/6541

The problem without this patch is that the awesome isotope library can't function properly as chrome and safari can't draw the images correctly.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can add in a new duplicate selector underneath this one:

img {
  width: auto;
  height: auto;
}

That should override it. Adding it into a new file that is called under the main one in the <head> section of your document would work too.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and the settings show up in the webkit debugger, but it sadly doesn't work. I need something that lets me just undo the reset. –  justingordon Jan 11 '13 at 20:24

I posted the answer here: https://github.com/twitter/bootstrap/issues/6541

Inlining this in the CSS worked, like this:

<img src="blah-blah" width=398 height=265 style="width:398px; height:265px">

In fact, I also tested Isotope without using the width and height attributes, like this:

<img src="blah-blah" style="width:398px; height:265px">

And that worked fine! Any recommendation if it's better to only specify the CSS?

I was able to very easily test this without bootstrap (or bootstrap 2.0) by using this CSS: img { width: auto; height: auto; }

It seems that the width and height in the CSS do override the image properties, and before the images get loaded, the browser does not know how much space to allocate, and then, even after the images load, the spacing is still wrong, at least with Isotope. Inlining the style does workaround the issue. I think I tried using regular styles, but that didn't seem to work, but I may have had a CSS priority issue. Any way, since the image size is laid out with the image properties, it's rather natural to put in this tiny bit of inline CSS. I hope we eventually find a better solution, as this will surely affect others when upgrading.

Or at least this should be documented that one needs to use the inline style for the width and height of the image rather than the properties.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.