Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a widget (some html code) that should be loadable on different Websites (which are not under my control) but the widget is hosted on my server.

Until now I had a PHP Script producing javascript code looking someting like this:

document.write('<div> ... some more dynamic html ...</div>'); 

which then could be loaded on any html page with the tag.

Now I'm planing a redesign and want to do the PHP part with server-side javascript. Do I still need to output document.write() or is there a more clever way now days, as we have handlebarjs, node.js etc. Also: I'd be interested I those new fancy autoupdate features frameworks like meteor or derby provide...

(I wanted to use meteor (meteor.com) to do the job but meteor outputs full html pages and I do not need a whole page)

Thank you for your help/sugestions

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Now I'm planing a redesign and want to do the PHP part with server-side javascript. Do I still need to output document.write()

You have to output something that will cause the content to be rendered on the client.

The client side code will be more or less independent of the server side code (although you might get some cross-over if you start using tools such as mojito.

or is there a more clever way now days, as we have handlebarjs, node.js etc.

node.js won't help with what you output, since it is a server and the JS to modify the page has to run in the browser.

You could use a template language like handlebarjs. You could use a library to aid DOM manipulation. The problems are that the more code you load (libraries included), the more likely you are to clash with something used by the third party websites upon which your code is embedded, and the heavier you make their pages (and large increases in page weight are a particularly poor idea for secondary content).

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't precise enough: the "document.write..."-part is generated javascript code from the server. But you have a point here with the libraries conflict... Thank you. –  renato Jan 11 '13 at 13:59
    
You were precise enough. document.write is something that will cause the content to be rendered on the client. –  Quentin Jan 11 '13 at 14:09

When you want to add a new div to an existing HTML document, you should do so by inserting a new HTML element into the document tree.

// create a new div 
var newDiv = document.createElement('div');
// put some text into it
newDiv.innerHTML = 'Hello World!';
// the div won't be displayed yet, because it only exists as a  
// variable in limbo outside of the HTML document tree. We need
// to insert it into the document.
// First, we get the HTML node where it should be inserted
var parentDiv = document.getElementById('id_of_the_div_where_the_new_div_belongs_into');
// then we put it into that div
parentDiv.appendChild(newDiv);

When you want to insert the div at the end of the page (useful when the script is supposed to work on many different pages you have no control over) you can also insert document.appendChild().

When the new div doesn't just contain text but also other HTML nodes, you should also create those with document.createElement and attach them to the newly created div with appendChild.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach, sadly when appending javascript code, I'd have to eval() that first and it's getting kind of complex. I think I'll have to stick with document.write() –  renato Jan 11 '13 at 13:57

Take a look on these: document.createElement, documentFragment

share|improve this answer
    
Why? How does what you posted answer the question? What is the OP supposed to do now? –  Rahul Jan 11 '13 at 12:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.