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I would like to know if in both cases the MyObject object is created. And if not, why do both cases work just fine?

MyObject[] abcd = new MyObject[8];
abcd[0] = MyObject();
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

and

MyObject[] abcd = new MyObject[8];
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

I know that in the first example, a MyObject array is created with 8 elements and stored in the reference variable of that array called abcd. I have an array of MyObject references but no actualy MyObject objects. So I create these objects and the first object is stored in array 0.

In the second example.. is it the same thing, just shorter code?

*EDITED: Forgot to add [] I apologize. *

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3  
abcd[0] = MyObject();? Does it compile? –  gefei Jan 11 '13 at 10:55
    
I think it was meant to be new MyObject(). –  Polynomial Jan 11 '13 at 10:55
    
Are you sure the first code even compiles? The second part will compile, but will throw an NPE. –  ppeterka Jan 11 '13 at 10:56
2  
The first line shouldn't compile either. –  Niklas R Jan 11 '13 at 10:57
    
@NiklasR nice spot, didn't find that quirk for the first glance! –  ppeterka Jan 11 '13 at 10:58
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming you meant

MyObject[] abcd = new MyObject[8];
abcd[0] = new MyObject();
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

this will work fine.

The second version will throw a NullPointerException unless someMethod happens to be static. In that case Java does not rely on an instance to be created for the static method to be invoked.

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+1 for the static, I always forget about this one... –  fge Jan 11 '13 at 11:02
    
Yes that is what I meant, sorry about that. And thank you for explaining that. Yes. someMethod(); is static actually for me. Why does it work only with Static methods? –  Space Ghost Jan 11 '13 at 11:11
1  
@ElmedinZelenkic because static methods do not need an instance to "run", they just need the class, which is "always" there. The JVM knows that the array is of type MyObject, this code is therefore equivalent to writing MyObject.someMethod(). –  fge Jan 11 '13 at 11:30
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It is not the same thing: when you create an array (and it should be declared as a MyObject[], not a MyObject), you just create a "placeholder", you do not create individual items in the array. And when an array is created, its elements are null at first, or whatever zero is for the different primitive types.

And in your first example, you should do new MyObject(), MyObject() alone will not work (except if there is a method by the name MyObject() in the current class which... returns an instance of class MyObject. Talk about confusion).

As a result, your second code will throw a NullPointerException (unless, as @Reimeus mentions in his answer, .someMethod() is a static method of class MyObject).

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MyObject abcd = new MyObject[8];
abcd[0] = MyObject();
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

this fragment does not compile it should be like

MyObject [] abcd = new MyObject[8];
abcd[0] = new MyObject();
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

In this case you are creating the array and putting one element at the index 0.

In your second case :

MyObject abcd = new MyObject[8];
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

it also doesn't compile, it should be

MyObject []abcd = new MyObject[8];
String str = abcd[0].someMethod();

and you will have a NullPointerException as abdc[0] is not initialized. (you created the array, but didn't put any element in it).

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Thank you for fixing that. It is exactly what I meant. But going further.. why does the second example work only with static methods? –  Space Ghost Jan 11 '13 at 11:15
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abcd[0] = MyObject();

This is not valid Java syntax; looks more like C++. You need

abcd[0] = new MyObject();

In Java an object is never the immediate value of a variable or an array element. Without that line, each array element is just null, so you won't be able to call any methods on it without getting NullPointerException.

In case your someMethod is static, what the line abcd[0].someMethod() actually compiles into is just

MyObject.someMethod();

The compiler ignores everything but the static type of the expression abcd[0], which is MyObject. This is a special case of Java semantics.

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