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I'm trying to extract some information from bash command output:

uptime | awk '{print $3}'

When running it I get this result: 8:27,

How can I delete the last symbol (i.e. the comma)?

share|improve this question
    
Post the output from "uptime" on your machine and the expected final output you want from your script so we can give you the best answer – Ed Morton Jan 11 '13 at 12:27
    
@EdMorton See my anwser for the differing outputs of uptime. – iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 12:58
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Another variant (replacing awk and sed with cut):

# "unnecessary" echo with evil backticks to get rid of extra spaces
echo `uptime|cut -d, -f1'

appears to work... until the uptime reaches one day (thanks to @sudo_O for pointing out). Then the output format will include the number of days, and we'll need

echo `uptime|cut -d, -f2`

(the latter was my original answer because I tested with uptime > 24h).

UPD: both solutions don't really work: the latter prints uptime hours with no days, the former fails to extract hours because there's no comma separator before them when there is no days -- but the rest of the answer is actually proved by those failures.

The whole approach is error-prone. What happens after months and years? (I seem to recall it still shows N days, but I can err). What if uptime is ever localised? (Did they refuse to do it for the sake of existing scripts?) What does it show for 1 user, "1 user" or "1 users"? If we know all the answers, do we want to depend on them?

If our purpose is showing uptime to the user, extracting the part between 'up' and 'users' with a regular expression would do the trick:

uptime | sed 's/^.*up\(.*\), *[0-9]\+ *users.*$/\1/'

If we want to compare time or collect statistics, something like Linux-specific /proc/uptime will work better (the first column in /proc/uptime is raw uptime seconds).

share|improve this answer
    
Its result: 5 users. suse 12.2 – Mark Egel Jan 11 '13 at 11:14
    
How did this get 4 upvotes, it's incorrect in the sense it prints the wrong results and the echo is completely unnecessary. – iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 11:16
    
Is it better with awk and sed on the same machine? BTW, I would prefer the first value from /proc/uptime on Linux. – Anton Kovalenko Jan 11 '13 at 11:16
    
@sudo_O echo+backquotes remove whitespace. And it's no more "incorrect" than all the answers and the original idea, all broken when the uptime output format includes/omits "up N days" (my variant "works" when days are present). – Anton Kovalenko Jan 11 '13 at 11:27
3  
@sudo_O Although I completely agree with the sentiment that $() notation should be used instead of backticks, backtics are command substitution. They are just horrible syntax. – William Pursell Jan 11 '13 at 12:11

You almost had it, just the substr or gsub functions with awk

$ uptime | awk '{print substr($3,1,length($3)-1)}'
2:49

$ uptime | awk '{sub(/,/,"");print $3}'
2:49

No need for excess piping or incorrect use of backticks.

Better yet a more robust solution given uptime differing output using (GNU) grep -Po "\d{1,2}:\d{2}(?=,)":

# More than one day    
$ uptime
12:46:18 up 92 days,  5:00,  2 users,  load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.05
$ uptime | grep -Po "\d{1,2}:\d{2}(?=,)"
5:00

# Less than one day
$ uptime
12:47:30 up  4:24,  7 users,  load average: 0.34, 0.12, 0.07       
$ uptime | grep -Po "\d{1,2}:\d{2}(?=,)"
4:24     

Or with sed -rn 's/.*([0-9]{1,2}:[0-9]{2}),.*/\1/p:

# More than one day
$ uptime
12:54:00 up 92 days,  5:07,  2 users,  load average: 0.03, 0.02, 0.05
$ uptime | sed -rn 's/.*([0-9]{1,2}:[0-9]{2}),.*/\1/p'
5:07

# Less than one day 
$ uptime
12:54:55 up  4:31,  7 users,  load average: 0.07, 0.10, 0.08
$ uptime | sed -rn 's/.*([0-9]{1,2}:[0-9]{2}),.*/\1/p'
4:31

UPDATE: So if the uptime is under an hour the output if different again!?

$ uptime
14:46:03 up 3 min,  4 users,  load average: 0.54, 0.75, 0.36

$ uptime
14:53:40 up 11 min,  4 users,  load average: 0.48, 0.62, 0.46

One regexp to rule them all:

$ sed -rn 's/.*up\s+(.*),\s+[0-9]+ users.*/\1/p' file
92 days,  5:00
4:24
11 min
3 min

I'm assuming this handles years also!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but no need for the ,$0 arg on gsub() as that's the default. It seems from other people's answers that sub() might be enough for the uptime output. – Ed Morton Jan 11 '13 at 12:44
    
Thanks @EdMorton clarity vs conciseness. – iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 12:51
    
+1 I think this would be the right one. we should trust linux/unix machine could run longer than 1 day without reboot. :) – Kent Jan 11 '13 at 13:43
    
@Kent I think you misunderstood my last point I am saying given the case you have just booted the uptime might be displayed 0:05 for 5 minutes or it might be just 05 or 5 so I haven't tested with times under one hour of uptime. – iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 13:45
    
@sudo_O I didn't misunderstand it. since I didn't see it. I upvote because your answer considered about the uptime longer than 1 day, it will make OP's awk $3 to be fail. from my point of view, OP didn't define the question well or I (you too) think too much. – Kent Jan 11 '13 at 13:52

uptime | awk '{print $3}' | tr -d ,

share|improve this answer

Given @sudo_O's sample uptime output (thanks!):

$ cat file
12:46:18 up 92 days,  5:00,  2 users,  load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.05
12:47:30 up  4:24,  7 users,  load average: 0.34, 0.12, 0.07

$ awk -F'[ ,]+' '{print $3 (/days/?" "$4" "$5:"")}' file
92 days 5:00
4:24

$ sed 's/.*up *\(.*\), *[0-9]* users.*/\1/' file
92 days,  5:00
4:24
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for no sed|awk or awk|sed :) – Kent Jan 11 '13 at 13:45

Use sed:

uptime | awk '{print $3}' | sed '$ s/,$//'
share|improve this answer
    
You never have to pipe awk into sed. – iiSeymour Jan 11 '13 at 11:09
    
but why? i'm always use awk | sed. – Mark Egel Jan 11 '13 at 11:11
    
Because awk can do whatever you want sed to do – Khaur Jan 11 '13 at 11:15
1  
@mouviciel you don't need to be an awk guru to do awk '{...; sub(/,$/,"")} instead of awk '{...} | sed 's/,$/,""/' and if you use awk for the small things like this then you'll learn it quickly. – Ed Morton Jan 11 '13 at 12:24
1  
@EdMorton in fact awk $3 "could" be wrong. if his machine runs longer than one day. – Kent Jan 11 '13 at 12:45

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