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I'm getting a compilation warning from Sun C++ 5.10 compiler about a hidden virtual method in some existing code that I'm changing. For whatever reason, the author has not implemented an override of the function for a given data type. I've recreated the situation here:

// First the data types
struct Shape {};
struct Square : public Shape {};
struct Circle : public Shape {};
struct Triangle : public Shape {};

// Now the visitor classes
struct Virtual
{   
    virtual ~Virtual() {}

    virtual void visit( Square& obj ) {}
    virtual void visit( Circle& obj ) {}
    virtual void visit( Triangle& obj ) {}
};

struct Concrete : public Virtual
{   
    void visit( Square& obj ) {}
    void visit( Circle& obj ) {}
};

int main()
{   
    Concrete myConcrete;

    return 0;
}

The Concrete class does not implement void visit( Triangle& obj ) {} and this is causing the following error message:

"pv_block.cpp", line 20: Warning: Concrete::visit hides the virtual function
Virtual::visit(Triangle&).

The code works fine but it would be nice to remove this warning message. I'd like therefore to implement the function so that the compiler is satisfied but in such a way that it cannot be used - preferably detected at compile time - since it's clearly not necessary at present.

Is there a way to implement a compile assertion to allow compilation but prevent use? I don't have access to either Boost or C++11.

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Can you not add it as a private method to the concrete class? –  Lieuwe Jan 11 '13 at 11:08
    
@Lieuwe, you can't really hide virtual methods. It might prevent someone from calling it, but in the case where you use a reference to Virtual, you pass right by the access restrictions. –  dans3itz Jan 11 '13 at 11:13
    
I missed that :) –  Lieuwe Jan 11 '13 at 11:15
    
@Lieuwe The reason Concrete doesn't implement it is because it is content with the implementation in Virtual, not because it doesn't want anyone to call it. Declaring and defining it in Concrete will break this. –  James Kanze Jan 11 '13 at 11:23
    
@JamesKanze - an instance of Concrete cannot visit a Triangle directly. The only way is to do this is to upcast the Concrete instance to Virtual: <static_cast><Virtual&>(myConcrete).visit(myTriangle);. –  David Hammen Jan 11 '13 at 12:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why would you want to prevent use? Even if you (somehow) do prevent it so that the following (A) fails to compile:

Triangle t;
Concrete x;
x.visit(t);

the following (B) will still work:

Triangle t;
Concrete x;
static_cast<Virtual&>(x).visit(t);

So IMO, it doesn't make sense to try to prevent it from being called. I would solve the warning by adding a using declaration into the Concrete class, like this:

struct Concrete : public Virtual
{ 
    using Virtual::visit;
    void visit( Square& obj ) {}
    void visit( Circle& obj ) {}
};

This will silence the warning, and enable (A). But I don't believe it's wrong to enable (A) in this case.

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1  
The using Virtual::visit is a excellent solution---I wish I'd thought of it. It shuts up the compiler, and documents in Concrete that you do want the default implemenatations from Virtual (although a normal C++ programmer should realize this without any documentation). –  James Kanze Jan 11 '13 at 11:28
    
@Agnew: The function currently doesn't exist so can't be used. I don't want to create something that isn't needed, especially if further down the line it causes problems if someone then tries to use it. So in that sense, I want to continue preventing use. However, I do want to avoid the compiler warning and preferably not just by turning it off. –  Component 10 Jan 11 '13 at 11:29
    
@Agnew: The using declaration works a treat. Thanks. –  Component 10 Jan 11 '13 at 11:40

While I don't necessarily agree with your design; I think the warning is valid and should be heeded as an example to reconsider. However, if this is what you want to do, you can just put the declaration in there and change the access to protected or something.

struct X {
   virtual void f() {}
   virtual void f(int) {}
};

struct Y : public X {
   virtual void f() {}
   virtual void f(int);
};

int
main() {
   Y y;
   y.f(10);
}

undefined reference to `Y::f(int)'
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By definition, a virtual function is "potentially evaluated" (the standardese term for used) unless it is pure virtual. So you must provide an implemenation of f(int. –  James Kanze Jan 11 '13 at 11:13
    
Meaning it "must" be implemented. :) –  dans3itz Jan 11 '13 at 11:17
    
@dans3itz: It's not my design as such, it's an existing piece of code that I've got to make some unrelated changes to. It probably could use a bit of an overhaul but that's outside the scope of what I'm doing. However, it is generating quite a few warnings - of which this is one - which are obscuring the compile output and I''d like to tidy them. I think you're right that making it private / protected is probably the best way to go. –  Component 10 Jan 11 '13 at 11:20
    
@Component10 I don't think so. That would change the semantics of the class, and probably break client code. In the case of the visitor pattern, providing default implementations of functions in the base class, so the user doesn't have to implement all of the functions, is a common idiom. The compiler is wrong to warn about it. –  James Kanze Jan 11 '13 at 11:25
1  
@Component10 - gcc will warn about this if you enable the compiler option -Woverloaded-virtual. –  David Hammen Jan 11 '13 at 12:40

The only real solution is to disable the compiler warning. Presumably the base class provides a default implementation, and the concrete class is happy with it. Otherwise, you can provide an implementation which forwards to the default implemenatation in the base class:

void Concrete::visit( Triangle& obj ) { Virtual::visit( obj ); }

Personally, I find this to be excess verbiage, and would rather avoid it.

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I'd like therefore to implement the function so that the compiler is satisfied but in such a way that it cannot be used - preferably detected at compile time - since it's clearly not necessary at present.

One way to do this is to declare Concrete::visit(Triangle&) as private:

struct Concrete : public Virtual
{   
   void visit( Square& obj ) {}
   void visit( Circle& obj ) {}
private:
   void visit (Triangle& obj);
};

Note the lack of an implementation. This eliminates the compiler warning, but does so at the expense of changing the compile-time error that currently results from myConcrete.visit(myTriangle) into a link-time error.

Even with this declaration, it's still possible to have a Concrete object visit a Triangle object by casting the Concrete object to the parent class: static_cast<Virtual&>(myConcrete).visit (myTriangle). This is a problem, and a very big one. The code as it stands violates the Liskov substitution principle.


It's probably better to use the using solution proposed by Angew. Now the class design comes closer to obeying Liskov substitution. Note that there is still a problem with regard to Liskov substitution with regard to static_cast<Virtual&>(myConcrete).visit (mySquare) (and myCircle).

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