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I have a question about rehashing. Let us say, we have a hash table of size 7, and our hash function is (key%tableSize). We insert 24 to the table, and 24 will be at index 3 since 24%7=3. Then, let us say we added more elements, and now we want to rehash. The table size will be twice the size of the initial table, i.e. new table size will be 14. Then, while copying the elements to the new hash table, for example, while copying the element 24, will it still be in the index 3, or will it be at the index 24%14=10. I mean, do we use the new table size while copying the elements, or the elements stay in their initial indexes? Thanks

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2 Answers 2

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It's depend on your hashing function. In your case you should use key%size_of_table else slots after 7 will never be mapped by hashing function. These slots will occupied only when you chose linear probing in order to tackle the collision.(Where we look for next empty slot). Chosing new size will help to reduce the collisions at early stage, else it would be the case table haven't reached the Load Factor still you are facing lot of collisions.

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Important thing about the hash tables is that the order of the elements is not guaranteed, it depends on the hash function.

For your example: if you copy the data into the new hash using 7 for hash size your indexes: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 of the new array will be unused because you've used bigger array and your hash function cant give you result bigger than 6. These unused indexes are a bad thing because simply you don't need them, so it's better to use key % 14 instead.

Interesting thing is that the internal hash table state depends not only by the hash function but it also can depend on the order in which the elements have been inserted. For example, imagine there's a hash table (implemented with array and linked lists) X with size 4 and you insert the elements 2,3,6,10 in that order:

x 
{
    [0] -> []
    [1] -> []
    [2] -> [2,6,10]
    [3] -> [3]
}

For hash function again is used key % size.

Now if we insert the keys in different order - 10, 6, 3, 2 we get:

x 
{
    [0] -> []
    [1] -> []
    [2] -> [10,6,2]
    [3] -> [3]
}

I've written all these lines above just to show you that two copies of a hash can look different internally because on many factors. I think that was the consideration of your question.

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