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Newb question: what is the best way to get a char iterator over a text file?

I tried:

std::fstream csvSource (fileName);

auto aChar = csvSource.begin();
while (aChar != csvSource.end())
{
  switch (*aChar)
  {
  case '"':
  //and so on

but the compiler complains that fstream doesn't have a begin method.

Note, that I can't do it line-by-line, because newline characters that are within quotes are treated differently (literaly) than the other new line characters.

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5 Answers 5

Use the >> operator from the ifstream class

std::ifstream csvSource (fileName);

csvSource >> noskipws;
char c;
while (csvSource>>c)
{
  switch (c)
  {
  case '"':
  //and so on

If you don't want to do fancy stuff with your iterators, that's the simplest way

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That won't work, it skips whitespace (see OP's comment on processing newlines). –  Angew Jan 11 '13 at 11:28
    
You can use a manipulator to override skipping whitespace, although that cuts down on simplicity –  Khaur Jan 11 '13 at 11:31
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If you have to use iterators, your best bet is istreambuf_iterator which is more optimal than istream_iterator when iterating chars.

Is there any particular reason though why you need to use iterators at all? They are there for the benefit of when you want to invoke an algorithm that requires them. But that isn't the case here as you are just looping.

You could just read in a char with get(). This might be better than operator>> which does a formatted read in, and will skip whitespace (which you might not want) unless you set skipws flag to false (I think it's noskipws) and may well be slightly less efficient.

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The code borrowed from another SO question was using string iterators, that's all. Is it better to use get() or >> operator? –  Grzenio Jan 11 '13 at 11:28
    
@Grzenio get fetches a single unformatted character, operator>> performs a formatted read, which if its operand is of type char will read a single character, skipping whitespaces. So, if you want to read a single character and you don't have any particular need for formatting, I'd recommend using get. –  Agentlien Jan 11 '13 at 11:31
    
operator>> will skip whitespace unless you set a particular flag and is likely to be less efficient than a straightforward get(). istream(buf)_iterators are there for the benefit of when you need to put them into algorithms that require them, but in your case you are just looping so don't really have any need for them. –  CashCow Jan 11 '13 at 11:40
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Try std::istream_iterator

  std::fstream csvSource (fileName);
  typedef std::istream_iterator<char> CharIter;
  for (CharIter it(csvSource); it != CharIter(); ++it)
  {
    /* process *it */
  }
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I think you're looking for std:: istreambuf_iterator as

#include <iterator>   //for std::istreambuf_iterator
#include <algorirthm> //for std::for_each

std:: istreambuf_iterator<char> begin(csvSource), end;
std::for_each(begin, end, [](char c)
             {
                  switch(c)
                  {
                        //your cases and code
                  }
             });

Or you can simply write csvSource >> c to read char-by-char. Both approaches are good. Which one to use, depends on situation.

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You can't use >>, that's formatted input and skips whitespace (which the OP is interested in). –  Angew Jan 11 '13 at 11:27
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You could also try to manually read character by character too:

for(int aChar = csvSource.get(); !csvSource.eof(); aChar = csvSource.get())
{
    switch(aChar)
    {
        //do stuff
    }
}
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