Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm very new to Python, but I have an aching problem. I have received a program which reads an infile (text), changes some values, and writes an outfile (also text). As the outfile grows bigger, the writes get slower and slower, making it unbearably slow after some 2 MB. Why can this be? I have tried altering the code to use buffers of different sizes, and I have changed it to cache the data into larger chunks (a string) before writing. I also tried join instead of += to create the string to be written. NONE of these do any difference at all to performance - except writing bigger chunks, which actually made the code SLOWER.(!!!)

Here is the method that writes the outfile. I moved the write portion from a separate method to inline:

for ifile in _file_stripper(f_in):
    parse_infile(ifile)
    date = variable_data['arkiveringsdatum']
    variable_data['arkiveringsdatum'] = datetime( int(date[0:4]), int(date[4:6]), int(date[6:8]), tzinfo=TZ()).isoformat('T')
    _personnr= variable_data['personnr'].replace('-', '').split(' ')[0]
    tmplist = ['<utskriftsstatus><brevid_kalla>', variable_data['brevid_kalla'], '</brevid_kalla><mapp>Se Allt</mapp><tidpunkt>', variable_data['arkiveringsdatum'], '</tidpunkt><dokumentpaket>', variable_data['dokumenttyp'], '</dokumentpaket><status>Utskriven</status><rensningsdatum>999999</rensningsdatum><kundid_gdb>', variable_data['kundid_gdb'], '</kundid_gdb><personnr>', _personnr, '</personnr></utskriftsstatus>']
    f_out.write(''.join(tmplist))

Method _file_stripper splits a big file into records. Infiles are 5-21 MB.

Please advice where to look for the error. When I talk about slowdown, the write speed falls down below 4KB written/second after around 1 MB has been written, and it keeps falling as the outfile grows bigger.

EDIT: On request, here is parse_infile and _file_stripper:

def parse_infile(f_in):
   index = ""     #variabel som håller vilken ondemandvariabel vi läser in
   found_data = 0  #1 ifall vi hittat det vi letar efter annars 0
   for row in f_in:
      if( 'personnr' in row):
         found_data=1
         index = "personnr"
      elif( 'kundid_gdb' in row):
         found_data=1
         index = "kundid_gdb"
      elif( 'brevid_kalla' in row):
         found_data=1
         index = "brevid_kalla"
      elif( 'arkiveringsdatum' in row):
         found_data=1
         index = "arkiveringsdatum"
      elif( 'GROUP_FILENAME' in row ):
         variable_data['dokumenttyp'] = row.split(':')[-1].split('.')[2].capitalize()
      elif(found_data==1):
         variable_data[index] = row.split(':')[1].strip() 
         index = ""  #Nollställ index ifall värden saknas i filen
         found_data=0
      else:
         pass

def _file_stripper(tot_file):
   try:
      myfile = []
      for rows in tot_file:
         if not 'GROUP_FILENAME' in rows:
            myfile.append(rows)
         else:
            myfile.append(rows)
            yield myfile
   except Exception:
      pass

variable_data = { "brevid_kalla": "", "arkiveringsdatum": "", 
          "kundid_gdb": "", "personnr": "",
          "dokumenttyp": "" }
share|improve this question
    
I forgot to mention that I of course tried file.open for the outfile with "w" as well as with "a". No difference. –  LJB Jan 11 '13 at 11:35
1  
You can edit your question to add more detail. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 11 '13 at 11:47
1  
Can you show us the definitions of _file_stripper() and parse_infile() too please? –  Martijn Pieters Jan 11 '13 at 11:48
    
Input data is in records with a fixed number of rows per record, with data sought for in FIELDNAME <CR/LF> FIELD VALUE <CR/LF> pairs. –  LJB Jan 14 '13 at 16:32
    
Are you only expecting there to be five records in each file? Otherwise the logic of parse_infile seems like it might be wrong. –  George Jan 14 '13 at 16:47
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your _file_stripper function adds to the myfile list endlessly, without ever reseting the list:

def _file_stripper(tot_file):
   try:
      myfile = []
      for rows in tot_file:
         if not 'GROUP_FILENAME' in rows:
            myfile.append(rows)
         else:
            myfile.append(rows)
            yield myfile
   except Exception:
      pass

Note that myfile is set outside the loop, and each row is appened to myfile, then yielded as is. Your process memory footprint will thus grow and grow, forcing the OS to start swapping out memory eventually, thus slowing your process to a crawl.

I think you meant to reset myfile when GROUP_FILENAME doesn't appear in rows:

def _file_stripper(tot_file):
   try:
      myfile = []
      for rows in tot_file:
         if not 'GROUP_FILENAME' in rows:
            myfile.append(rows)
         else:
            myfile.append(rows)
            yield myfile
            myfile = []
   except Exception:
      pass
share|improve this answer
    
Could be, I will test that - thanks, Martijn! –  LJB Jan 14 '13 at 18:42
    
@LJB: I am pretty damn certain it is, if that's your actual code. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Jan 14 '13 at 18:46
    
I just want to confirm that this did indeed do the trick. I told the author of the code, and the myfile was intially a GENERATOR. He later changed the code and forgot to initialize it as needed. BIG THANKS for helping me find it! –  LJB Jan 16 '13 at 13:32
    
Now, if there is a good way to mark this question as "Resolved", please do that... its not in the FAQ, AFAICS. :D –  LJB Jan 16 '13 at 13:37
    
@LJB: Looks like you figured it out. :-) It is in the "How to Ask" section of the FAQ. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 16 '13 at 14:32
add comment

Most likely what is going on is that your variable_data, or more likely, some fields in it, are growing up with each parsed file.

Your parse_infile function is pprobably not reseting it and appending values of new files to values already there, making it grow larger for each file read - that would result in resources used in a (O² ) as you describe.

The best pratice there is not to rely on global variables - make your parse_infile function create a fresh dictionary on each interaction, and return it to the caller. On your main function, assign the return value of the function to your dictionary:

def parse_infile(file_):
    variable_data = {}
    (...)
    return variable_data

(...)
for ifile in _file_stripper(f_in):
    variable_data = parse_infile(ifile)
    (...)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.