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I am currently at the making of a "Jewel Game" for android:

enter image description here

The thing is, up until now, i have only made a minesweeper game on the android platform in which i had instant response to user actions such a screen touch, i didn't had to worry about any animation of objects, moving images and such, but now ask you may know, in the jewel game when u ask to switch between 2 gems they have a transforming type animation of them switching around, and only when the animation ends it calculates (as i believe happens) if the choice is correct and what other gems are in the combo.

There is such effects on menu items as well in games, when you click on an item that directs you to another screen let's say, there is a slight delay in which you can see the button pressed down.

My question is: How can i handle such a thing easily? does it really depends on the animation to end? it doesn't look very smart to be animation depended.

thank you.

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1 Answer 1

What I've done in the past to handle this sort of problem is I've simply 'locked' out all player input until the animation(s) finish. If there are multiple animations I would create an 'animation event queue' which the game checks upon every player input and upon an 'animation finished' event. Each event represents some animation, in this context it would be something like a block(s) moving, a block(s) vanishing, a new block(s) appearing, etc. Only when the queue is empty is when I would unlock the controls.

This probably will not work in a more fast paced game where things needs to be really responsive (the game I did this in was a turn based one). I'd be interested in ways others solve this particular problem as well.

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SO at the end, there is something like animation finished method right? so the game does depended on an animation to end to resume it's logic right? –  Daniel Mendel Jan 11 '13 at 12:01
    
Yes, pretty much. The game logic did run separately in it's own part for every step, but the 'showing part' would be slower as it needed to be animated. If anything went wrong during animation, the current + other animation events could be skipped as well by discarding the queue and moving on with the game. –  mitim Jan 12 '13 at 0:37

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