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Just started using VBA and I'm trying to access all the data in a dummy table I set up called Employees.

This is the code im trying:

Sub getRecords()

Dim dbs As Database
Dim rst As Recordset
Dim sql As String

Set dbs = CurrentDb
sql = "SELECT * FROM Employees"
Set rst = dbs.OpenRecordset(sql)

End Sub

The ultimate aim here is to print the contents to the screen — would this involve breaking down the record set into different components? If so what components could make up a typical record set?

The table format is as follows:

Emp_Id    - Number
Emp_Name  - Text
Emp_Email - Text
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can iterate through the fields:

Sub getRecords()

Dim dbs As Database
Dim rst As Recordset
Dim sql As String

Set dbs = CurrentDb
sql = "SELECT * FROM Employees"
Set rst = dbs.OpenRecordset(sql)

Do while not rst.eof
   For each fld in rst.Fields
      Debug.Print fld, fld.name
   Next
   rst.MoveNext

   ''You can also edit or add
   rst.Edit
   rst!Emp_Name = "Something"
   rst.UpDate
Loop

End Sub

I would avoid calling variables names that are also properties, such as SQL.

For updates, you are usually best to use an Action query and Execute againt a database object:

 db.Execute "UPDATE aTable SET aField = 'Some text'", dbFailOnError
share|improve this answer
    
nice answer - some things though: Coming from a java background you can seperate lines of text using \n is there a similar option in VBA? –  Katana24 Jan 11 '13 at 11:55
1  
You can use vbCrLf, vbCr and vbLf, also chr(13) and chr(10) separately or together, and vbNewLine. Debug.Print prints single lines to the immediate window (ctrl+G for the window). Always remember MS Access is a lot easier than you think :) –  Fionnuala Jan 11 '13 at 11:59

You'll need to start by looping through the records. Try:

Do While Not rst.EOF And Not rst.BOF
...
Loop

To do that. BOF and EOF relate to the beginning and end of the recordset respectively. If there's no data in the table then the whole loop will be skipped.

From there you can look at the fields individually by either using an index to relate to the position of the field in the select list, or by referring to the field name, like so:

Do While Not rst.EOF And Not rst.BOF
    Debug.Print rst.Fields("myfield")
    Debug.Print rst.Fields(0)
Loop

That's a starting point. Intelisense should really help you with this.

PS: always remember to close your recordset objects afterward to reclaim the memory: rst.Close() Set rst = Nothing

Kind regards, Paul.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for closing the record set –  Katana24 Jan 11 '13 at 11:53
    
Forgot to add the MoveNext though! Ooops! –  Westie Jan 11 '13 at 11:59
    
Was gonna say but that line doesn't work - I get run time error 91. Where does the MoveNext object go? –  Katana24 Jan 11 '13 at 12:00
    
You may want to consider what type of recordset you actually need. For your example you would be best going for a forward only type - much faster, especially as you don't appear to want to edit the info. Remou has shown the way for editing. –  Westie Jan 11 '13 at 12:02
1  
"Always worth checking for the BOF" Not with DAO unless you are moving backways. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/… Closing the recordset is not essential these days, either, but I guess it does not hurt. –  Fionnuala Jan 11 '13 at 12:14

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