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Lets say if there is a boolean variable status. Assume status has value false.

I would like to know what is the difference between

if ( status = true )
{
   //block of code
}

if ( status == true )
{
   //block of code
}

I've tried to understand it by writing a sample program, the code in the first if block gets executed for whatever the value status is having (true or false).

For other primitive types, system throws compile time error if I use only one "=" in if and why it doesn't throw the error in case of boolean type. Thanks.

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2  
The first one is an assignment, you not comparing anything –  justMe Jan 11 '13 at 12:11
1  
The reason the code in the body of the if statement gets executed is that the result of the assignment is what's on the right, i.e. a true. The old value of status does not matter at all: it gets overwritten. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 11 '13 at 12:15
    
@dasblinkenlight Yeah, got it. if we are assigning false to status in if, then the code in the block is not getting executed. Thanks. –  Code Enthusiastic Jan 11 '13 at 12:24
    
The first code block will ALWAYS be executed, what you say here is that: if status which I know is true is true do this, the other one checks if status is true then it continues –  Thomas Lindvall Jan 11 '13 at 12:27
    
Yeah, we often forget that assignemtns are expressions that yield a result. Even if not very readable, we can write: if(isPositive = x > 0) DoSomething(); which compares and assigns at the same time. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 11 '13 at 13:50

9 Answers 9

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The first one is not a comparison, it is an assignment. The reason it compiles is that it assigns a boolean value, so the result of the assignment is also a boolean value.

The first statement assigns status a new value, and executes the if according to that new value (true in your case). The second statement compares the current value of status to the value on the right, and acts on the result of the comparison.

Note that is it never a good idea to compare boolean in Java or bool in C# to true or false: you can use if (status) instead of if (status == true) and if (!status) instead of if (status == false). This, however, does not hold for nullable types in C#, so comparing bool? to true or false is often a good idea.

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3  
Also. The '=' will always execute because first you assigning it to true which will become if(true) –  RTRokzzz Jan 11 '13 at 12:11
1  
Comparisons like if (status) may seem strange at a first glance, but become much clearer with a good naming: if (isDeviceEnabled). An even worse variant is if (status == true) return true; else return false; can be simplified return status; –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 11 '13 at 13:42

if ( status = true ) will always be true, because you first assign true to status. On the other hand, if ( status == true ) will only be true it status is true.

The best way to write it and avoid typos or confusion is:

if (status) { }
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At the first codepart you are assigning and not checking the value of status! To avoid this errors you could write it like that:

if (status)
if (!status)

(this works only for booleans)

or

if ( true == status )

if ( "Peter" == name )

This swapping of the position of the var and string/value works for all variable types, some coders use this to avoid typos with = and ==,

because if you accidently write

if ( status = true )

instead of

if ( status == true )

This wouldnt work but wont give you a compiler error.(it would just set the var to true)

But if you are used to write

if ( true == status )

and you are making a typo and miss one of the equality signs the compiler will give a error.

or you could use equals:

if (name.equals("Peter"))
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To compare Strings for equality, don't use ==. The == operator checks to see if two objects are exactly the same object. Use equals instead. –  aphex Jan 11 '13 at 12:23
    
as long as the variables are strings and no objects this works fine... but ill change it :D –  Vloxxity Jan 11 '13 at 12:27
1  
@aphex: Not in C# (which is one of the tags of this question). There, == is perfectly fine for strings. –  Sebastian Negraszus Jan 11 '13 at 12:29
    
Please elaborate more on the "works for all variable types" statement. –  Niklas R Jan 11 '13 at 12:36
1  
i hope its a bit clearer now :D –  Vloxxity Jan 11 '13 at 12:53

if(status = true) will set status to true, then it sees true... this if will always be true.

if(status == true) is actually a check, this is what you want to use

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In java if ( status = true ) is assignment, not comparision.

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1  
-1 it is not a compilation error. The return value of an assignement is the assignee, in this case status, which is a boolean and the code compiles fine. It would not if status were an int for example. –  assylias Jan 11 '13 at 12:10
1  
yes... i forgot about type... soryy.. ;) NO probs for -1... :) –  NamingException Jan 11 '13 at 12:13

First case is not comparing. Is just assinging status variable. And new status value will be returned. In this case is true.

See:

= Operator returns the operand value as result.

== Operator returns true if the values of its operands are equal or returns true if its two operands refer to the same object in case of reference type.

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In order to emphasize the difference between the two operators you could experiment with yoda conditions for a short while.

Yoda conditions are when you use the constant value as the first operand so your code will transform from: if ( status = true ) to if ( true = status ). You cannot assign anything to the constant true so the compiler will give you a syntax error (preventing succesful compilation). Using a Yoda condition will force the compiler to give you a syntax error, rather than a warning.

I believe yoda conditions originate from unmanaged code and older compilers and don't serve a great deal of good in .NET languages but could be a fun way to learn the difference.

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Yes, but why use yoda conditions if you can simply write if(status)? –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 11 '13 at 13:59
    
@OlivierJacot-Descombes I think Alex means in general. It's "unfortunate" that the example in question is a boolean variable. –  J. Steen Jan 11 '13 at 21:34

The First is for assignement, status = true and the second is for comparision status == true.

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5  
This has already been stated a few times. –  J. Steen Jan 11 '13 at 12:15

explaination of

If (Status = true){ 
// code execution
}

and

If (Status == true){ 
// code execution
}

If you try to check if 2 values equal to each other, you use

value1 == value

If you try to assign a value to another variable, you use

value1 == value

So what does "If (value = value){}" do ?

To explain this you Need to know, that Java checks, if a variable can be defined. If it is possible Java does.

So if you write a code like

If (Status = true){
System.out.println("Variable Status successfully changed!");
} else {
System.out.println();
}

it will try to assign the value "true" to the variable Status, then return if succeded. IF it succeded the condition will be entered and "Variable Status successfully changed!" will be printed to console.

THEORETICALLY

But since Java requires a boolean as condition it won't function.

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