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I created a method ( bool readList(vector a) ) that reads a list. I want to create a vector on main a send to this method as argument. For example:

bool readList(vector<int> a){
   //Fill...
}
void main(){
   vector<int> my_vector;
   readList(my_vector);
   //work with my vector
}

I should use pointers correct? But how? I already tried a few possibilities and none of them work.

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1  
Pass the vector by reference: bool readList(vector<int>& a) { –  hmjd Jan 11 '13 at 12:23
    
Why not std::vector<int> readList()? –  Kerrek SB Jan 11 '13 at 12:26
    
Because I need to check for errors. –  Ricardo Neves Jan 11 '13 at 12:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Right now you're passing a by value (making a copy), modifying it and then discarding the result. You should pass a by reference instead:

// a passed by reference
bool readList(vector<int>& a){ 
   //Fill...
}
void main(){
   vector<int> my_vector;
   readList(my_vector); // inside readList a will now refer to my_vector
   //work with my vector
}

Also, you should change the signature of main to return int.

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I already tried that, it didnt work. –  Ricardo Neves Jan 11 '13 at 12:26
    
In what way didn't it work? –  Andreas Brinck Jan 11 '13 at 12:27
    
It should (although std::vector<int> readList() {...} and std::vector<int> my_vector(readList(); would be more idiomatic. –  James Kanze Jan 11 '13 at 12:28
    
although on debug the vector is being filled on readList, my_vector size is zero. –  Ricardo Neves Jan 11 '13 at 12:28
    
I'm using namespace std –  Ricardo Neves Jan 11 '13 at 12:29

Like the STL algorithms do, you can change readList to take an output iterator like following:

#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

template<class OutputIterator>    
OutputIterator readList(OutputIterator result) {
    // For example: Adds 0, 1, 2, 3, 4
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        *result++ = i;
    return result;
}

int main() {
    std::vector<int> my_vector;
    readList(std::back_inserter(my_vector));
    return 0;
}
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You want to pass by reference in this case. To do this change your method definition to:

bool readList(vector<int>& a){
   //Fill...
}
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You need to use a reference.

bool readList(vector<int>& a)

This means that any changes made to a propagate to it's source, my_vector.

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I already tried that, it didnt work. –  Ricardo Neves Jan 11 '13 at 12:26

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