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I understand that I can enable auto-completion in Notepad++ by going to "Settings -> Preferences -> Backup/Auto-completion". With Python for example, the auto-completion only works for a set of pre-defined functions. I've read this link. Does anyone know how to make intellisense in Notepad++ for the functions and methods that I define? I'm no expert in this but I was thinking, surely there must be a way that Notepad++ can automatically detect function definition in the code, and add those functions to its intellisense database or something? Do you know what I mean?

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possible duplicate of How can I enable auto complete support in Notepad++? –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 11 '13 at 12:51

1 Answer 1

You may be interested in the relative documentation. Have a look at the files in %ProgramFiles%\Notepad++\plugins\APIs.

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Thanks Alain1405. What that documentation seems to show is how to add another function to the database. What I was rather looking for is the ability to detect a function definition automatically, and automatically add it to a (perhaps temporary) database, available for auto-completion and calltip. Do you know what I mean? Obviously, I don't want to have to manually add a function to the auto-completion definition files every time I define a new function in my source code. –  Ray Jan 11 '13 at 13:04
    
I strongly doubt that what you ask it exist. I also strongly doubt that Notepad++ can do any kind of code analysis, so how can it recognize a function definition? As far as I know there isn't any plugin for this. Try with Vim with omnicomplete plugin. Other good IDE's for python are emacs, Komodo, NetBeans, PyDev or WingIDE. Source here stackoverflow.com/questions/81584/what-ide-to-use-for-python. –  Alain1405 Jan 13 '13 at 1:55
    
Thank you very much! Yeah I too doubted that such things existed, that's really what I was asking. –  Ray Jan 14 '13 at 17:49

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