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I need to extract the Date of Birth(DOB) of each patients of some dicom images. The reason behind extracting this is that, I will only change the month and the date of the patients in those dicom images for maintaining the privacy of the patients, but not the year. I know how to change the DOB using dcmtk, but as I will not change the full date and as I need to keep the year intact I somehow first need to extract the DOB and get the year from it and then change in such way that I would keep the year same as before. But I don't know what is dcmtk command for getting the patient DOB from dicom image. Do you know which command it is?

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You can use dcmtk's dcmdump with the file to get an output of the file info:

dcmdump file.dcm

which produces:

# Dicom-File-Format

# Dicom-Meta-Information-Header
# Used TransferSyntax: Little Endian Explicit
(0002,0000) UL 202                                      #   4, 1 FileMetaInformationGroupLength
(0002,0001) OB 01\00                                    #   2, 1 FileMetaInformationVersion
(0002,0002) UI =CTImageStorage                          #  26, 1 MediaStorageSOPClassUID
(0002,0003) UI [1.2.392.200036.9116.2.6.1.48.1211393765.1205425184.928242] #  58, 1 MediaStorageSOPInstanceUID
(0002,0010) UI =LittleEndianImplicit                    #  18, 1 TransferSyntaxUID
(0002,0012) UI [1.2.804.114118.3]                       #  16, 1 ImplementationClassUID
(0002,0013) SH [eFilm]                                  #   6, 1 ImplementationVersionName
(0002,0016) AE (no value available)                     #  16, 0 SourceApplicationEntityTitle

which you can just grep to get the correct tag:

dcmdump file.dcm | grep "(0010,0030)"

which will only output one line:

(0010,0030) DA [19330813]                               #   8, 1 PatientBirthDate

I think you can figure out what to do here... but you might want to pipe this output to sed or awk at this point.

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Exactly right. I figured out later :p. –  the_naive Jan 21 '13 at 13:56

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