Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I feel like this has to be a duplicate, but I can't seem to find it anywhere and I didn't get anything with a very quick google search.

Is there a way to change the name of stuff in a module so that it doesn't conflict with the name of something local (or global)? Consider the example:

module namespace
   real x  !some data
   contains
   subroutine foo()
     write(0,*) "foo!"
   end subroutine foo
end module
subroutine foo()
   write(0,*) "foo is the new bar :)"
end subroutine

program main
  use namespace
  real x
  call foo() !should print "foo is the new bar"
  call namespacefoo() !somehow call module namespace's version of foo
end program main

The above code doesn't compile because x isn't defined. Of course if I don't want a local variable named x, then I could use namespace, only: foo, but it seems a little cumbersome to have to mangle my local variable names. (as a side note, I'm pretty sure that I've seen this before with some magic in the only part of the statement ...)


For the benefit of those who also know python, I'm looking for something similar to python's:

import namespace as other_namespace

Or I guess since Fortran doesn't quite have that level of namespace control:

from namespace import somefunc as otherfunc
from namespace import somedata as otherdata
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need renaming:

[luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ cat ren.f90
module namespace
   real x  !some data
   contains
   subroutine foo()
     write(0,*) "foo!"
   end subroutine foo
end module
subroutine foo()
   write(0,*) "foo is the new bar :)"
end subroutine

program main
  use namespace, local_name => x, namespacefoo => foo  
  real x
  call foo() !should print "foo is the new bar"
  call namespacefoo() !somehow call module namespace's version of foo
end program main
[luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ nagfor ren.f90
NAG Fortran Compiler Release 5.3.1 pre-release(904)
Warning: ren.f90, line 17: X explicitly imported into MAIN (as LOCAL_NAME) but not used
Warning: ren.f90, line 17: Unused local variable X
[NAG Fortran Compiler normal termination, 2 warnings]
[luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ ./a.out
 foo is the new bar :)
 foo!

Though of course it's better to keep things private to the module if at all possible to avoid precisely this kind of thing

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that is what I needed. Good suggestion. Coming from python I'm not used to thinking about "private" data, but python makes it really easy to keep namespaces separate so it's not necessary -- And there are conventions which are in place to say "Please don't mess with this variable unless you know what you're doing" –  mgilson Jan 11 '13 at 13:45

Seems that I should have looked harder in my google search:

use namespace, only: namespace_x => x, namespacefoo => foo

"imports" namespace's x under the local name namespace_x and namespace's subroutine foo as namespacefoo in the local namespace.

Some code for the benefit of others:

module namespace
   real x  !some data
   real y
   contains
   subroutine foo()
     write(0,*) "foo!"
   end subroutine foo
end module

subroutine foo()
   use namespace, only: x,y
   write(0,*) "foo is the new bar :)"
   write(0,*) "by the way, namespace.x is:",x
   write(0,*) "by the way, namespace.y is:",y
end subroutine

program main
  use namespace, only: namespacefoo => foo, y, z => x
  real x
  x = 0.0
  y = 1.0
  z = 2.0
  call foo() !should print "foo is the new bar"
  call namespacefoo() !somehow call module namespace's version of foo
end program main
share|improve this answer
    
Another subtle difference with Python is that use namespace, only: z => x is similar to from namespace import x as z and will import and rename only x, while you can also use namespace, z => x to import all public entities in module namespace and rename only x (as in Ian's answer). –  sigma Jan 11 '13 at 15:28
    
@sigma -- Thanks for pointing that out. I hadn't actually read Ian's answer that carefully. –  mgilson Jan 11 '13 at 15:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.