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I have a Map<List<String>,Integer> where each entry is a path (List<String>) and a count

Ex:

["a1", "a2", "a3"] => 4
["a1", "a2"] => 2
["b1", "b2", "b3"] => 3
["b1"] => 4
["b1", "b2"] => 3
["c1", "c2", "c3", "c4"] => 5

I want to output a tree with count for each node

Tree:

- ROOT
-- a1 : 6
--- a2 : 6
---- a3 : 4
-- b1 : 7
--- b2 : 3
-- c1 : 5
--- c2 : 5
---- c3 : 5
----- c4 : 5

JSON Structure:

{
    "name": "",
    "count": "",
    "children": [
        {
            "name": "",
            "count": "",
            "children": []
        }
    ]
}

What can be the most efficient data-structure and then how to use it in this case (the tree should be then serialized into a JSON tree)?

share|improve this question
    
how is the tree to be serialized in JSON. Can you give an example? Why the keys are lists, not single values? Why the different number of dashes in front of the different keys? –  Boris Strandjev Jan 11 '13 at 13:39
    
Your original structure seems way to complicated, any reason why you have opted for such a structure instead of a more traditional tree structure using Nodes? –  atomman Jan 11 '13 at 13:44
    
Can you post an example of the expected JSON? –  fge Jan 11 '13 at 13:44
    
@atomman yes because I have a list of path and I can't rely on a separator (because I have no idea about the content of a path), so I kept the list –  JohnJohnGa Jan 11 '13 at 13:45
    
@fge the JSON should simply represent a Tree where each node contains an array of children and a count –  JohnJohnGa Jan 11 '13 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would create a tree structure using Nodes, then use XStream to serialize the structure. Examples below, hope this helps you out.

Convertion to Node structure

public static Node createNodes(Map<List<String>, Integer> map) {
    Map<String, Node> namemap = new HashMap<String, Node>();
    Node root = new Node();
    Node current;
    for (Entry<List<String>, Integer> path : map.entrySet()) {
        current = root;
        for (String nodename : path.getKey()) {
            Node p;
            if (!namemap.containsKey(nodename)){
                p = new Node(nodename, path.getValue());
                namemap.put(nodename, p);
            }else {
                p = namemap.get(nodename);
                p.addCost(path.getValue());
            }
            current.addChild(p);
            current = p;
        }

    }

    return root;
}

Serialization

public static String toXML(Node n) {
    XStream xstream = new XStream(new JsonHierarchicalStreamDriver());
    xstream.alias("node", Node.class);
    return xstream.toXML(n);
}

Node Object

public class Node {

    private String name;
    private int count;
    private List<Node> children;

    public Node() {
        this(null, 0);
    }

    public Node(String name, int count) {
        this.name = name; 
        this.count = count;
        this.children = new ArrayList<Node>();
    }


    public void addChild(Node n) {
        for (Node nn : children) {
            if (nn.name.equals(n.name)) {
                return;
            }
        }
        this.children.add(n);
    }

    public void addCost(int i) {
        this.count += i;
    }
}

JSON output

{"node": {
  "count": 0,
  "children": [
    {
      "name": "c1",
      "count": 5,
      "children": [
        {
          "name": "c2",
          "count": 5,
          "children": [
            {
              "name": "c3",
              "count": 5,
              "children": [
                {
                  "name": "c4",
                  "count": 5,
                  "children": [
                  ]
                }
              ]
            }
          ]
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "name": "b1",
      "count": 10,
      "children": [
        {
          "name": "b2",
          "count": 6,
          "children": [
            {
              "name": "b3",
              "count": 3,
              "children": [
              ]
            }
          ]
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "name": "a1",
      "count": 6,
      "children": [
        {
          "name": "a2",
          "count": 6,
          "children": [
            {
              "name": "a3",
              "count": 4,
              "children": [
              ]
            }
          ]
        }
      ]
    }
  ]
}}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 It's very clear –  JohnJohnGa Jan 11 '13 at 15:23
    
Please accept the answer if you find it sufficient. –  atomman Jan 11 '13 at 16:56

Me, personally, I would create a Node class that has children and my count value, then tell your JSON serializer how to serialize it properly for your needs.

share|improve this answer

I would change your Map to:

Map<String[], Integer>

if you want to stay with List, then use ArrayList and trim() it.

Then you have to decide if you use a HashMap, or if you really want a tree (TreeMap). In the later case you should create an Path object, with a field String[] or List<String>.
This Path object then must implement Comparable, which you habe to implement.

To perform a Serialisation (Json or others systems), you usually will writing out the key-value pairs. On reading back again you will build up your map or tree again by feeding in the (key, value) pairs.

It is not a good idea to have the tree structure in the json or otherwise serialized file. You will nearly never need that.

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