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I have two identical sections of code where there are three div's contained inside a parent tag. One parent tag is the HTML5 tag and the other is a div tag with a class ".footer". I have given these two sections identical css code, but I am receiving different results. I am resizing the height of first contained div tag with the class ".one" to be 400px, which is larger than its containing tags height which is 300px. With the HTML5 tag the entire containing div expands with the larger div. However the div with the class "footer" remains unchanged. Is this because I am writing my css improperly or do HTML5 tags behave differently than div tags?

View it on JSFiddle

  <div class="footer">

        <div class="one">
            div 1
        </div>

        <div class="two">
            div 2
        </div>

        <div class="three">
            div 3
        </div>

    </div>

    <footer>

        <div class="one">
            div 1
        </div>

        <div class="two">
            div 2
        </div>

        <div class="three">
            div 3
        </div>

    </footer>

Here is the CSS I used

.footer{
    background-color: rgba(0,0,102,1);
    width: 1000px;
    height: 1%;
    overflow: auto;
    }
.footer div {
    margin-right: 50px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 300px;
    float: left;
    margin-left: 50px;
    }
footer{
    background-color: rgba(0,51,255,1);
    width: 1000px;
    height: 1%;
    overflow: auto;
    }
footer div {
    margin-right: 50px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 300px;
    float: left;
    margin-left: 50px;
    }
.one{
    height: 400px;
    }
share|improve this question
3  
What browser are you viewing the site in? – Josh Mein Jan 11 '13 at 13:58
    
I am receiving the same results in firefox, chrome, ie, and safari – Biglu315 Jan 11 '13 at 14:19
    
The only difference between html5 block elements (header, footer, section, aside, etc...) and a standard DIV is semantics. They all render exactly as a DIV and do not receive any special styling from the browser stylesheet. The only advantage to using HTML5 elements is to declaratively mark up a header, footer, etc. in code, thus giving your code more meaning to both humans and computers. – Ryan Wheale Jan 11 '13 at 17:49

This might be on account of user agent stylesheets. Browsers give default formatting to different elements. As an example, Chrome displays p as display: block; and gives it some margin, but doesn't do the same for span. Without a reset stylesheet in place, there's no reason to think two HTML elements would display the same in a given browser.

Edit:

However, this isn't your issue. The problem here is specificity. You might already know this, but when there are two competing values for a given element's property, CSS chooses the property defined by the most specific selector. In this case, the selector .footer div is more specific than .one, so the child div is using the height defined by .footer div, which happens to be the shorter one.

Change the selector of your child div to be more specific, which you could do by using an id, and it works as you'd expect.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this response. And even though this is a valuable practice that I should and will implement into my development process, it didn't create anymore consistency between the two tags. – Biglu315 Jan 11 '13 at 14:18
    
@Biglu315 updated my answer. – jmeas Jan 11 '13 at 14:40
    
I guess I am just coming to realize that .footer div is considered more specific than .one. I was under the assumption that because .one was the class assigned to the div, that it would be the most specific, but it appears that all of ".one" properties are being over written by the properties in .footer div. Adding an additional level to the ".one" tag gives me the control I expected. Thank you for your help. – Biglu315 Jan 11 '13 at 17:11
    
No problem. You should accept the answer if you that that it answers your question! – jmeas Jan 11 '13 at 17:15

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