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Is there a way in C++11 to cast an array of one type to another data type at compile-time :

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <type_traits>

int main()
{
   static constexpr std::array<double, 3> darray{{1.5, 2.5, 3.5}};
   static constexpr std::array<int, 3> iarray(darray); // not working
   // Is there a way to cast an array to another data type ? 
   return 0;
}
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5  
No.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 11 '13 at 14:09
    
I'd write a function that explicitly casts the elements one-by-one –  jt234 Jan 11 '13 at 14:09
1  
In C++11 you can't even read the array in a constexpr way. Assuming your implementation makes operator[] constexpr as an extension, you can create a constexpr function that creates your iarray. –  Marc Glisse Jan 11 '13 at 14:16
    
@MarcGlisse Even with std::get ? –  Vincent Jan 11 '13 at 14:21
    
Check the standard, the array overloads of get don't have constexpr on them. –  Marc Glisse Jan 11 '13 at 14:25

4 Answers 4

You cannot cast, but you can copy:

static constexpr std::array<double, 3> darray{{1.5, 2.5, 3.5}};
std::array<int, 3> iarray;

std::copy(begin(darray), end(darray), begin(iarray));

Unfortunately iarray cannot be constexpr any more in this case.

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The question specifically requires the conversion be done at compile-time. –  Ben Voigt Jan 11 '13 at 15:07
1  
@Ben But since that’s not possible in the current C++ standard (see ecatmur’s answer & comments), this is the next best thing. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 11 '13 at 15:09

No, but you can do it by hand fairly easily using the indices trick, assuming the implementation provides constexpr std::get (or equivalently a constexpr overload of operator[]):

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <type_traits>

// http://loungecpp.wikidot.com/tips-and-tricks%3aindices
template <std::size_t... Is>
struct indices {};
template <std::size_t N, std::size_t... Is>
struct build_indices: build_indices<N-1, N-1, Is...> {};
template <std::size_t... Is>
struct build_indices<0, Is...>: indices<Is...> {};

template<typename T, typename U, size_t i, size_t... Is>
constexpr auto array_cast_helper(
   const std::array<U, i> &a, indices<Is...>) -> std::array<T, i> {
   return {{static_cast<T>(std::get<Is>(a))...}};
}

template<typename T, typename U, size_t i>
constexpr auto array_cast(
   const std::array<U, i> &a) -> std::array<T, i> {
   // tag dispatch to helper with array indices
   return array_cast_helper<T>(a, build_indices<i>());
}

int main() {
   static constexpr std::array<double, 3> darray{{1.5, 2.5, 3.5}};
   static constexpr std::array<int, 3> iarray = array_cast<int>(darray);
}

If your implementation doesn't provide constexpr get or operator[], you can't use array as there's no current standard way to access array elements constexpr; your best bet is to use your own implementation of array with the constexpr extensions.

The constexpr library additions are proposed for addition to the standard in n3470.

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A few empty lines (and putting function bodies on a separate line) between the definitions would increase readability thousandfold … furthermore, is std::get constexpr for std::array? Not according to cppreference.com. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 11 '13 at 14:43
    
this code works fine on gcc 4.7.2. Is it not standard? –  balki Jan 11 '13 at 14:49
    
gcc has extensions... –  Marc Glisse Jan 11 '13 at 14:50
    
@KonradRudolph cheers, fixed and discussed. Feel free to edit for clarity. –  ecatmur Jan 11 '13 at 14:50
1  
You can use the templated conversion operator trick to remove the need to pass int to array_cast. –  Puppy Jan 11 '13 at 14:53

Instead of an unmaintainable mess of cryptic template code that won't even currently compile with the most commonly used C++ compiler, and avoiding ungood redundancy in the number specs, simply use a macro:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <type_traits>

#define MY_VALUES( T ) {T(1.5), T(2.5), T(3.5)}

int main()
{
    static constexpr std::array<double, 3>   darray  = { MY_VALUES( double ) };
    static constexpr std::array<int, 3>      iarray  = { MY_VALUES( int ) };
    // Whatever...
}

This is the kind of stuff macros are good at.

Just make sure to minimize the possibility of name collision by using an all uppercase macro name, and maybe some custom prefix.


General advice: don't be too clever, keep it simple.

Keep in mind, someone has to maintain it later.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've found a very simple solution with a single variadic function:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename Type, typename OtherType, std::size_t Size, typename... Types, class = typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(Types) != Size>::type>
constexpr std::array<Type, Size> convert(const std::array<OtherType, Size> source, const Types... data);

template<typename Type, typename OtherType, std::size_t Size, typename... Types, class = typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(Types) == Size>::type, class = void>
constexpr std::array<Type, Size> convert(const std::array<OtherType, Size> source, const Types... data);

template<typename Type, typename OtherType, std::size_t Size, typename... Types, class>
constexpr std::array<Type, Size> convert(const std::array<OtherType, Size> source, const Types... data)
{
    return convert<Type>(source, data..., static_cast<const Type>(source[sizeof...(data)]));
}

template<typename Type, typename OtherType, std::size_t Size, typename... Types, class, class>
constexpr std::array<Type, Size> convert(const std::array<OtherType, Size> source, const Types... data)
{
    return std::array<Type, Size>{{data...}};
}

int main()
{
   static constexpr std::array<double, 3> darray{{1., 2., 3.}};
   static constexpr std::array<int, 3> iarray = convert<int>(darray);
   std::cout<<(std::integral_constant<int, iarray[2]>())<<std::endl;
   return 0;
}
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+1 although as mentioned in ecatmur's answer operator[] has to be declared constexpr for this to work which is unfortunately missing in the current standard (although with gcc it is constexpr). –  Jesse Good Jan 11 '13 at 21:11

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